clutter

  1. a confused multitude of things
  2. many things in a disorderly state

clutter

(from the article `radar`) Echoes from land, sea, rain, snow, hail, birds, insects, auroras, and meteors are of interest to those who observe and study the environment, but ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/100

clutter

[n] - a confused multitude of things 2. [n] - many things in a disorderly state 3. [v] - fill a space in a disorderly way
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=clutter

Clutter

• (n.) Clatter; confused noise. • (n.) To clot or coagulate, as blood. • (v. t.) To crowd together in disorder; to fill or cover with things in disorder; to throw into disorder; to disarrange; as, to clutter a room. • (v. i.) To make a confused noise; to bustle. • (n.) A confused collection; hence, confusion; disorder; as, ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/clutter/

clutter

noun unwanted echoes that interfere with the observation of signals on a radar screen
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Clutter

[advertising] Advertising or marketing clutter refers to the large volume of advertising messages that the average consumer is exposed to on a daily basis. This phenomenon results from a marketplace that is overcrowded with products leading to huge competition for customers. Marketing clutter is a major problem for marketers and advertisers...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clutter_(advertising)

Clutter

[radar] Clutter is a term used for unwanted echoes in electronic systems, particularly in reference to radars. Such echoes are typically returned from ground, sea, rain, animals/insects, chaff and atmospheric turbulences, and can cause serious performance issues with radar systems. If the Clutter Return Power is greater than the System Nois...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clutter_(radar)

Clutter

[software] Clutter is a GObject-based graphics library for creating hardware-accelerated user interfaces. Clutter is an OpenGL-based `interactive canvas` library and does not contain any Graphical control elements. It relies upon OpenGL (1.4+) or OpenGL ES (1.1 or 2.0) for rendering,{cn|date=January 2014}. It also supports media playback us...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clutter_(software)

Clutter

Clut'ter intransitive verb To make a confused noise; to bustle. « It [ the goose] cluttered here, it chuckled there. Tennyson. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/97

Clutter

Clut'ter noun [ Confer W. cludair heap, pile, cludeirio to heap.] 1. A confused collection; hence, confusion; disorder; as, the room is in a clutter . « He saw what a clutter there was with huge, overgrown pots, pans, and spits. L'Estrange. »
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/97

Clutter

Clut'ter transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Cluttered ; present participle & verbal noun Cluttering .] To crowd together in disorder; to fill or cover with things in disorder; to throw into disorder; to disarrange; as, to clu...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/97

Clutter

Clutter is the collective noun for a group of spiders.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BCA.HTM

Clutter

Excessive amounts of advertising carried by media vehicles. Term refers to the total amount of adver
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Television_%28TV%29/

Clutter

Is defined as all non-programming content, which includes network and local commercial time, public service announcements (PSAs), public service promotions (PSPs), promotions aired by broadcast and cable networks, program credits not run over continuing program action, and
Found on http://www.lincolnmedia.com/resources/glossary-of-media-terms

Clutter

Same as Clowder.
Found on http://www.cat-world.com.au/glossary

Clutter

Unwanted radar echoes ret1ected from heavy rain, snow, waves, etc., which may obscure relatively lar
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Radar/

Clutter

When an advertisement is surrounded by other ads, thereby forcing it to compete for the viewer's or listener's attention.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21023
No exact match found