Charm

[programming language] Charm (language) is an object oriented computer programming language devised in the early 1990s with similarities to the RTL/2, Pascal and C languages in addition to containing some unique features of its own. The Charm language is defined by a context-free grammar amenable to being processed by recursive descent pars...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charm_(programming_language)

Charm

A spell or object possessing magic power.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20137

Charm

A spell or object possessing magic power.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20157

charm

[n] - something believed to bring good luck 2. [v] - control by magic spells, as by practicing witchcraft 3. [v] - protect through supernatural powers or charms 4. [v] - induce into action by using one`s charm
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=charm

Charm

The flavor of the fourth quark. See also: Bottom, Down Quark, Quark, Top.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/c/h/charm/source.html

Charm

Charm (chärm) noun [ French charme , from Latin carmen song, verse, incantation, for casmen , akin to Sanskrit çasman , çasā , a laudatory song, from a root signifying to praise , to sing .] 1. A melody; a song. [ Obsolete] « ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/56

Charm

Charm transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Charmed ; present participle & verbal noun Charming .] [ Confer French charmer . See Charm , noun ] 1. To make music upon; to tune. [ Obso...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/56

Charm

Charm intransitive verb 1. To use magic arts or occult power; to make use of charms. « The voice of charmers, charming never so wisely. Ps. lviii. 5. » 2. To act as, or produce the effect of, a charm; to please greatly; to be fascinating. 3. To mak...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/56

charm

good luck charm noun something believed to bring good luck
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Charm

• (n.) A melody; a song. • (n.) To subdue, control, or summon by incantation or supernatural influence; to affect by magic. • (n.) That which exerts an irresistible power to please and attract; that which fascinates; any alluring quality. • (n.) Any small decorative object worn on the person, as a seal, a key, a silver whistle, ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/charm/

charm

a practice or expression believed to have magic power, similar to an incantation or a spell. Charms are among the earliest examples of written ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/59

charm

charm 1. The power or quality of pleasing or delighting; attractiveness. 2. A particular quality that attracts; a delightful characteristic.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/435/

Charm

Pleasure, Charm, and Beauty in Human Life and in Nature Greek: Graces (goddesses); Aglaia (brilliance); Euphrosyne (joy); Thalia (bloom) Latin: (no equivalent goddess)
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1370/5

Charm

A physical property (quantum number, degree of freedom) carried by a fourth quark. In the original quark model, three quarks ('up', 'down' , 'strange') are variously combined to produce the known hadrons. The addition of a fourth quark, the 'charmed' quark, gives rise to several new hadron states called charmed particles. Proposed to account for an...
Found on http://www-bdnew.fnal.gov/operations/accgloss/gloss.html

Charm

he quality that makes an audience enjoy watching a performer.
Found on http://www.improvcomedy.org/glossary.html

Charm

The quality that makes an audience enjoy watching a performer.
Found on http://www.improvcomedy.org/glossary.html

charm

A quantum number that is equal to the number of charm quarks in a particle minus the number of anticharm quarks. Charm quarks were the fourth flavor (type) of quark to be discovered, in 1974. The lightest particles with charm are the D mesons, which are approximately twice as heavy as the proton.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/charm.html

charm

charm, magical formula or incantation, spoken or sung, for the purpose of securing blessing, good fortune, or immunity from evil. It presupposes a belief in demons or malignant spirits. The formula was frequently inscribed upon an amulet, talisman, or trinket to be worn for protection.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0811512.html

Charm

A charm is anything believed to possess some occult or supernatural power, such as an amulet, spell, etc, but the term is properly applied (as the name, derived from the Latin carmen a song, indicates) to spells couched in formulas of words or verses.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AC.HTM

Charm

Charm is the collective noun for a group of goldfinches.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BC.HTM

charm

In physics, a property possessed by elementary particles, including one type of quark (very small particles found inside protons and neutrons), called the charm quark. The effects of charm are only seen in experiments with particle accelerators. See elementary particles
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0026305.html

Charm

One "flavor" of quarks. Also known as the C quark.
Found on http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/glossary.html

Charm

The quality that makes an audience enjoy watching a performer.
Found on http://www.improvcomedy.org/glossary.html

Charm

[quantum number] By convention, the sign of flavour quantum numbers agree with the sign of the electric charge carried by the quark of corresponding flavour. The charm quark, which carries an electric charge (Q) of +{Frac|2|3}, therefore carries a charm of +1. The charm antiquarks have the opposite charge (Q {{= −{Frac|2|3}}}), and flavou...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charm_(quantum_number)

Charm

Charms can be simple items that add to a jewellery piece or can be in the form of an amulet that has the alleged magical power of protecting its owner from danger or bad luck. They can be added to necklaces or even bracelets.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22607
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