Tyranny

• (n.) The government or authority of a tyrant; a country governed by an absolute ruler; hence, arbitrary or despotic exercise of power; exercise of power over subjects and others with a rigor not authorized by law or justice, or not requisite for the purposes of government. • (n.) Severity; rigor; inclemency. • (n.) Cruel government...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/tyranny/

tyranny

(from the article `United Kingdom`) Power fell gradually into the hands of tyrants. Chief of these was Vortigern (c. 425), who, unlike earlier usurpers, made no attempt to become Roman ... ...casually mentions a man called Evarchus as `tyrant` of a small northwestern Greek polis called Astacus in the 420s . But for this chance...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/100

tyranny

A form of government in which one person rules arbitrarily.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21177

Tyranny

a government ruled by a tyrant who uses his power oppressively or unjustly; an absolute ruler; from the Greek word tyrannos.
Found on http://www.hestories.info/greco-roman-world-glossary.html

tyranny

arbitrary and unrestrained abuse of power.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21664

tyranny

Aristotle's term for a political system* wherein one bad person holds all the power and authority. (Cf. kingship.)
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary078.htm

tyranny

dominance through threat of punishment and violence
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/158769

tyranny

tyranny (s), tyrannies (pl) 1. Absolute power arbitrarily or unjustly administered; despotism. 2. An arbitrarily cruel exercise of power; a tyrannical act. 3. In Greek history, the office or the administration of a tyrant. 4. Severity; roughness. 5. Etymology: from Old French tyrannie, from Late Latin tyrannia, 'tyranny'; which came from ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2207/

tyranny

[TI-ran-nee] A system of government in which one person has all the power. Such a ruler is called a 'tyrant'. Tyrants were not necessarily bad rulers. Some peolpe think that Kypselos, the tyrant of Corinth, was a popular leader.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ancientgreece/glossary/index.shtml
No exact match found