Burglary

Trespassing in a property and stealing or attempting to steal. (Crimes against property)

Burglary

the crime of entering someone else's property without permission in order to steal, vandalise, rape or commit GBH

BURGLARY

breaking and entering a dwelling at night (with intent to commit a felony)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21814

Burglary

Burglary (also called breaking and entering and sometimes housebreaking) is a crime, the essence of which is illegal entry into a building for the purposes of committing an offence. Usually that offence will be theft, but most jurisdictions specify others which fall within the ambit of burglary. To engage in the act of burglary is to burgle (in Br...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burglary

Burglary

(n) Burglary is the intended, unauthorized entry into a building, premises vehicle etc with an intention to do or carry out any crime, whether forcefully breaking into the building , premises vehicles etc or otherwise. In burglary it is not necessary that a crime should have been committed .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

burglary

[n] - entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=burglary

Burglary

• (n.) Breaking and entering the dwelling house of another, in the nighttime, with intent to commit a felony therein, whether the felonious purpose be accomplished or not.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/burglary/

burglary

noun entering a building unlawfully with intent to commit a felony or to steal valuable property
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=burglary

Burglary

Bur'gla┬Ěry noun ; plural Burglaries [ Fr. Burglar ; confer Late Latin burglaria .] (Law) Breaking and entering the dwelling house of another, in the nighttime, with intent to commit a felony therein, whether the felonious purpose be accomplished or not. Wharton. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/B/114

Burglary

Any unlawful entry into, or remaining in, any building with the intent to commit a crime.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/b125.htm

burglary

Breaking into and entering a building with intent to commit a felony.
Found on http://www.pacourts.us/learn/legal-glossary

burglary

burglary, at common law, the breaking and entering of a dwelling house of another at night with the intent to commit a felony, whether the intent is carried out or not. This definition has been generally adopted with some modifications in the criminal law of the various states of the United States. ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0809492.html

burglary

in criminal law, the breaking and entering of the premises of another with an intent to commit a felony within. Burglary is one of the specific ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/b/130

burglary

n. the crime of breaking and entering into a structure for the purpose of committing a crime. No great force is needed (pushing open a door or slipping through an open window is sufficient) if the entry is unauthorized. Contrary to common belief, a burglary is not necessarily for theft. It can apply to any crime, such as assault or sexual harassmen...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=110

burglary

Offence committed when a trespasser enters premises with the intention to steal, do damage to property, grievously harm any person, or rape a woman. Entry does not need to be forced, so, for...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

burglary

Offence committed when a trespasser enters premises with the intention to steal, do damage to property, grievously harm any person, or rape a woman. Entry does not need to be forced, so, for example, a person who puts his hand through a broken shop window to steal something may be guilty of burglary. In English and Welsh courts, burglary is conside...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0034022.html
No exact match found