bridge

1. an obstruction in the borehole, usually caused by the caving in of the well or the borehole or by the intrusion of a large boulder. 2. a tool place in the hole to retain cement or other material; it may later be removed, drilled out, or left permanently.

Bridge

Walkway above the stage or auditorium used to reach stage equipment. (UK)

Bridge

A structure above the weather deck, extending the full width of the vessel, which houses a command centre, itself called by association, the bridge.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary101.htm

bridge

Type: Term Pronunciation: brij Definitions: 1. The upper part of the ridge of the nose formed by the nasal bones. 2. One of the threads of protoplasm that appear to pass from one cell to another. Synonyms: fixed partial denture
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=12322

Bridge

Bridge is American slang for a quantity of four.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZBA.HTM

Bridge

In music, a bridge is the small arch or bar at right angles to the strings of a violin, guitar, etc. which serves to raise them and transmit their vibrations to the body of the instrument.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VB.HTM

Bridge

A bridge is a kind of fresh perspective in the middle of a song, a small part that may consist of only music, or both lyrics and music, usually placed after the second chorus (sometimes referred to as the middle eight). An example is the lines: 'And when I touch you I feel happy inside/ It's such a feeling that my love I can't hide' from 'I Wanna H...
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/soldonsong/glossary/b.shtml

Bridge

The contrasting section of music/lyrics which often occurs after the second chorus of a song.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

bridge

[n] - something resembling a bridge in form or function 2. [n] - the hard ridge that forms the upper part of the nose 3. [n] - a circuit consisting of two branches (4 arms arranged in a diamond configuration) across which a meter is connected 4. [n] - a wooden support that holds the strings up 5. [n] - a denture anchored to t...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=bridge

Bridge

Mobile platform suspended over the stage or audience that provides access to lanterns.
Found on http://www.queens-theatre.co.uk/technical/glossaryoftheatreterms.htm

Bridge

A Layer 2 device which transfers data frames from one Local Area Network to another, typically across a wide area communications link. Wireless bridges allow Local Area Networks in remote buildings to be networked via relatively high speed point-to-point or point-to-multipoint line-of-sight wireless links, often at relatively low cost.
Found on http://www.lever.co.uk/wlan-glossary.html

Bridge

a fixed appliance (prosthesis) that replaces missing teeth. A bridge is a series of attached crowns (abutments and pontics).
Found on http://www.cosmeticdentistryguide.co.uk/glossary.html

Bridge

The bridge assembly, or just 'bridge' is an area on the face of the guitar where the string meet or are connected to the face.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Bridge

A brass or nickel block screwed to the top plate of a movement, with a hole in it (often jewelled) to support one end of the arbor of a wheel.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20450

Bridge

(NETWORK GLOSSARY) A device that connects and passes packets between two network segments. Bridges operate at layer two (data link) of the 031 reference model and are insensitive to upper layer protocols.
Found on http://www.instrument-net.co.uk/newworkglossary.html

Bridge

A term used to identify a motherboard component that ties one bus to another. A PCI-to-PCI bridge will tie two PCI busses together. A PCI-to-CardBus bridge will tie PCI and CardBus together.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20505

Bridge

A bridge is a custom device anchored to neighbouring teeth that replaces one or more missing teeth. When a lost tooth is replaced with bridgework, the teeth on either side of the missing one must be prepared as crowns which will serve as abutments to hold the replacement teeth in place.
Found on http://www.39harleystreet.co.uk/glossary.htm

Bridge

a computer or other dedicated hardware that links two networks of the same type together and does some filtering of packets from one network to the other and vice versa
Found on http://www.archivemag.co.uk/

Bridge

The section for fixing and supporting The strings on an acoustic guitar. The method of supporting The strings on an electric or acoustic guitar
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20596

bridge

Structure that provides a continuous path or road over water, valleys, ravines, or above other roads. The basic designs and combinations of these are based on the way they bear the weight of the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Bridge

A term used to describe the power circuit of the drive, consisting of thyristors only in a fully controlled bridge and a combination of thyristors and diodes in a half controlled bridge.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20823

Bridge

A Wheatstone bridge configuration utilizing four active strain gages.
Found on http://www.flowmeterdirectory.com/flowmeter_technical_glossary/flowmeter_te

bridge

( bridging) A formation of solder that connects (bridges) adjacent conductors, such as two leads, completing an unwanted connection, causing short. One of the causes of an electrical short.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20870

Bridge

Bridge: A set of one or more false teeth supported by a metal framework, used to replace one or more missing teeth. Bridges may be fixed or removable. A fixed bridge (a partial denture) is a prosthetic replacement of one or more missing teeth; it is cemented (or otherwise attached) to the neighboring teeth or may be implanted in the space. A remova...
Found on http://www.medterms.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=2532

Bridge

A networking device that links networks together. It is a less intelligent version of a router
Found on http://www.ft.com/dbglossary
No exact match found