wear

  1. impairment resulting from long use
  2. covering designed to be worn on a person's body
  3. the act of having on your person as a covering or adornment

Wear

In materials science, wear is erosion or sideways displacement of material from its `derivative` and original position on a solid surface performed by the action of another surface. Wear is related to interactions between surfaces and more specifically the removal and deformation of material on a surface as a result of mechanical action of the o.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wear

wear

[n] - impairment resulting from long use 2. [n] - the act of having on your person as a covering or adornment 3. [v] - have in one`s aspect 4. [v] - last and be usable 5. [v] - deteriorate through use or stress 6. [v] - be dressed in 7. [v] - put clothing on one`s body 8. [v] - have on one`s person 9. [v] - ha...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=wear

Wear

• (n.) The result of wearing or use; consumption, diminution, or impairment due to use, friction, or the like; as, the wear of this coat has been good. • (n.) A dam in a river to stop and raise the water, for the purpose of conducting it to a mill, forming a fish pond, or the like. • (n.) A long notch with a horizontal edge, as in th...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/wear/

wear

get into verb put clothing on one`s body; `What should I wear today?`; `He put on his best suit for the wedding`; `The princess donned a long blue dress`; `The queen assumed the stately robes`; `He got into his jeans`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=wear

wear

wearing noun the act of having on your person as a covering or adornment; `she bought it for everyday wear`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=wear

Wear

[journal] Wear is a scientific journal publishing papers on wear and friction. The papers may fall within the subjects of physics, chemistry, material science or mechanical engineering. It is published by Elsevier. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wear_(journal)

Wear

Wear intransitive verb 1. To endure or suffer use; to last under employment; to bear the consequences of use, as waste, consumption, or attrition; as, a coat wears well or ill; - - hence, sometimes applied to character, qualifications, etc.; as, a man wears well as an acquaintance....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/19

Wear

Wear noun Same as Weir .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/19

Wear

Wear transitive verb [ Confer Veer .] (Nautical) To cause to go about, as a vessel, by putting the helm up , instead of alee as in tacking, so that the vessel's bow is turned away from, and her stern is presented to, the wind, and, as she turns still farther, her sails fill o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/19

wear

1. A dam in a river to stop and raise the water, for the purpose of conducting it to a mill, forming a fish pond, or the like. ... 2. A fence of stakes, brushwood, or the like, set in a stream, tideway, or inlet of the sea, for taking fish. ... 3. A long notch with a horizontal edge, as in the top of a vertical plate or plank, through which water f...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Wear

HMS Wear was a British River Class frigate of 1460 tons displacement launched in 1942. HMS Wear was powered by two Admiralty 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 20 knots. She carried a complement of 140 and was armed with two 4-inch dual-purpose guns; ten 20 mm anti-aircraft guns and one Hedgehog multiple spigot mortar.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RW.HTM

Wear

Loss of material from a surface by means of relative motion between it and another body. Third bodies i.e. grit
Found on http://www.poeton.co.uk/w1/glossary.htm

wear

Metal lost during handling and contact with other objects.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/10142

Wear

River in northeast England; length 107 km/67 mi. From its source near Wearhead in the Pennines in County Durham, it flows eastwards along a narrow valley, Weardale, to Bishop Auckland and then northeast past Durham and Chester-le-Street, to meet the North Sea at Sunderland
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0024499.html

Wear

Sailing in a circle to change direction downwind to aviod a gybe. May also mean turning away from the wind, as in veer.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20645

Wear

The artificial removal of material, or impairment of the stone surface finish, through friction or impact.
Found on http://www.selectstone.com/architectural-resources/stone-glossary/

Wear

the attrition or rubbing away of the surface of a material as a result of mechanical action.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21121

Wear

The loss of material from solid surfaces due to mechanical abrasion.
Found on https://www.ioshospital.com/orthopaedics/learnMore/glossaryOfTerms.aspx

wear

the removal of material from a solid surface as a result of mechanical action exerted by another solid. Wear chiefly occurs as a progressive loss of ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/w/17

Wear

The removal of material or impairment of surface finishing through friction or impact use.
Found on http://www.contractorschoolonline.com/Masonry-Glossary.aspx

Wear

The undesired deterioration of a component by the removal of material from its surface.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22067

wear

to turn a ship's stern to windward to alter its course
Found on http://phrontistery.info/nautical.html

wear

to turn a ship's stern to windward to alter its course
Found on http://phrontistery.info/w.html

wear

Type: Term Pronunciation: wār Definitions: 1. Wasting or deterioration caused by friction.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=99754
No exact match found