wave

An oscillating motion that moves outward from the source of some disturbance (ripples running away from a pebble tossed in a pond). Waves transmit the energy of the disturbance away from its source.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/w.shtml

Wave

In physics, a wave is disturbance or oscillation that travels through matter or space, accompanied by a transfer of energy. Wave motion transfers energy from one point to another, often with no permanent displacement of the particles of the medium—that is, with little or no associated mass transport. They consist, instead, of oscillations or vib...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave

WAVe

WAVe stands for Web Analysis of the Variome is a next-generation web-based bioinformatics tool for the human variome research domain. WAVe enables gene-centric navigation over miscellaneous resources in a modern and agile web interface. ==Funding== WAVe is being developed for the European GEN2PHEN Project by the UA.PT Bioinformatics and Computatio...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WAVe

Wave

(1) An oscillatory movement in a body of water manifested by an alternate rise and fall of the surface. (2) A disturbance of the surface of a liquid body, as the ocean, in the form of a ridge, swell or hump. (3) The term wave by itself usually refers to the term SURFACE GRAVITY WAVE (PROGRESSIVE). See also CAPILLARY WAVE, GRAVITY WAVE, PROGRESSIVE ...
Found on http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/sea/swces/products/glossary.htm

Wave

(from the article `Hepworth, Dame Barbara`) As Hepworth`s sculpture matured during the late 1930s and `40s, she concentrated on the problem of the counterplay between mass and space. Pieces ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/w/16

wave

(from the article `telecommunication`) Analog-to-digital conversion begins with sampling, or measuring the amplitude of the analog waveform at equally spaced discrete instants of time. The ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/w/16

wave

(wāv) a uniformly advancing disturbance in which the parts undergo a change in direction, such as a progressing disturbance on the surface of a liquid. variation in the transmission of electromagnetic energy, especially the periodic change in direction of a reading on a monitoring device.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

wave

[n] - an undulating curve 2. [n] - something that rises rapidly and dies away 3. [n] - one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water) 4. [n] - (physics) a progressive disturbance propagated without displacement of the medium itself 5. [n] - the act of signaling by...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=wave

Wave

• (n.) Something resembling or likened to a water wave, as in rising unusually high, in being of unusual extent, or in progressive motion; a swelling or excitement, as of feeling or energy; a tide; flood; period of intensity, usual activity, or the like; as, a wave of enthusiasm. • (v. i.) To play loosely; to move like a wave, one way and...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/wave/

wave

wafture noun the act of signaling by a movement of the hand
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=wave

wave

undulation noun (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=wave

wave

(earth science) In the oceans, a ridge or swell formed by wind or other causes. The power of a wave is determined by the strength of the wind and the distance of open water over which the wind blows (the fetch). Waves are the main age...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0016227.html

wave

(physics) Click images to enlargeIn physics, oscillation that is propagated from a source. Mechanical waves require a medium through which to travel. Electromagnetic waves do not; they can travel through a vacuum. Waves carry energy but they do n...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006049.html

Wave

[audience] The wave (known as the Mexican wave in the anglosphere outside North America) is an example of metachronal rhythm achieved in a packed stadium when successive groups of spectators briefly stand, yell, and raise their arms. Immediately upon stretching to full height, the spectator returns to the usual seated position. The result i...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_(audience)

Wave

[Deraniyagala book] Wave: Life and Memories after the Tsunami is a memoir by Sonali Deraniyagala based on the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami. It was first published in 2013 by Alfred A. Knopf. It recounts the story of the author`s life before the tsunami struck the coast, and how it changed dramatically after the disaster. It is w...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_(Deraniyagala_book)

Wave

[gesture] A wave is a movement of the hand that people use to greet each other, say goodbye or merely acknowledge another`s presence. People wave by raising their hand and moving it from side to side. Another common wave is to raise one`s hand and repeatedly move the fingers downward toward the palm. The gesture can be used to attract atten...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_(gesture)

Wave

[magazine] Wave is an English-language, monthly magazine published by Annapurna Media (pl). Each month, Wave publishes articles addressing the youth and their varied interests. Apart from touching on the lighter fun side, it also addresses more `serious` aspects - but from a youthful perspective. The magazine has a large impact on the urban...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_(magazine)

Wave

Wave (wāv) transitive verb See Waive . Sir H. Wotton. Burke.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/16

Wave

Wave intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Waved (wāvd); present participle & verbal noun Waving .] [ Middle English waven , Anglo-Saxon wafian to waver, to hesitate, to wonder; akin to wæfre waveri...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/16

Wave

Wave noun [ From Wave , v. ; not the same word as Middle English wawe , waghe , a wave, which is akin to English wag to move. √136. See Wave , intransitive verb ] 1. An advancing ridge or swell on the su...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/16

Wave

Wave transitive verb 1. To move one way and the other; to brandish. '[ Æneas] waved his fatal sword.' Dryden. 2. To raise into inequalities of surface; to give an undulating form a surface to. « Horns whelked and waved like the enridged sea.» Sh...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/16

wave

1. An advancing ridge or swell on the surface of a liquid, as of the sea, resulting from the oscillatory motion of the particles composing it when disturbed by any force their position of rest; an undulation. 'The wave behind impels the wave before.' (Pope) ... 2. <physics> A vibration propagated from particle to particle through a body or el...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Wave

A continuous fluctuation in the amplitude of a quantity with respect to time.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Wave

a disturbance that propagates in a periodically repeating fashion, often transferring energy
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary303.php

wave

A disturbance that travels from one place to another without actually transporting any matter. The source of all waves is something that is vibrating, moving back and forth at a regular, and usually fast rate. Familiar examples of waves are the surface waves on water, or transverse waves on a stre...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/W/wave.html
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