Warp

The cotton that runs lengthwise in a woven fabric. The warp is stronger and denser than the weft (crosswise) yarns.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21771

Warp

(F Voilement, R Deformare, Distorsiune) Change from a straight or true plane condition
Found on http://www.angelfire.com/biz/BuildingPathology/BldngPathGlsry.html

warp

(from the article `rug and carpet`) ...a woven textile with those of animal fleece. Knotted pile is constructed on the loom on a foundation of woven yarns, of which the horizontal yarns ... Early looms consisted of two forked branches joined by a crosspiece holding the suspended warp, or lengthwise threads, through which the weft, or .....
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/w/10

warp

[n] - a shape distorted by twisting or folding 2. [n] - a moral or mental distortion 3. [n] - yarn arranged lengthways on a loom and crossed by the woof
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=warp

Warp

• (v. t.) To twist the end surfaces of (an aerocurve in an aeroplane) in order to restore or maintain equilibrium. • (v. t.) To weave; to fabricate. • (v. i.) To fly with a bending or waving motion; to turn and wave, like a flock of birds or insects. • (v. t.) To run off the reel into hauls to be tarred, as yarns. • (v.) Th...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/warp/

warp

warping noun a moral or mental distortion
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=warp

Warp

[magazine] Warp was a New Zealand magazine and official organ of the National Association for Science Fiction (NASF), the country`s first national science fiction fan organisation. ==History== First published in November 1977, Warp continued on a usually two-monthly schedule until the late 1990s, surviving for a short period independently a...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warp_(magazine)

Warp

[record label] Warp, commonly referred to as Warp Records, is a pioneering independent British record label, founded in Sheffield in 1989, notable for discovering some of the more enduring artists in electronic music. Founded by Steve Beckett and the late Rob Mitchell from their experiences working at the FON record shop, alongside record p...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warp_(record_label)

WARP

[systolic array] The Warp machines were a series of increasingly general-purpose systolic array processors, created by Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), in conjunction with industrial partners G.E., Honeywell and Intel, and funded by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The Warp projects were started in 1984 by H. T. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WARP_(systolic_array)

Warp

[video game] Warp is a text adventure game, written in the early 1980s by Rob Lucke and Bill Frolik for the Hewlett-Packard HP 3000. The game was never officially released, but found widespread distribution through the HP INTEREX user community. It became so popular among HP users that the authors were compelled to include a mechanism to pr...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warp_(video_game)

Warp

[weaving] In weaving cloth, the warp is the set of lengthwise yarns that are held in tension on a frame or loom. The yarn that is inserted over-and-under the warp threads is called the weft, woof, or filler. Each individual warp thread in a fabric is called a warp end or end. Warp means `that which is thrown across` (Old English wearp, from...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warp_(weaving)

Warp

Warp intransitive verb 1. To turn, twist, or be twisted out of shape; esp., to be twisted or bent out of a flat plane; as, a board warps in seasoning or shrinking. « One of you will prove a shrunk panel, and, like green timber, warp , warp Shak. &#x...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/8

Warp

Warp noun [ Anglo-Saxon wearp ; akin to Icelandic varp a casting, throwing, Swedish varp the draught of a net, Danish varp a towline, Old High German warf warp, German werft . See Warp , v. ] 1. (Weaving) The th...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/8

Warp

Warp transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Warped ; present participle & verbal noun Warping .] [ Middle English warpen ; from Icelandic varpa to throw, cast, varp a casting, from verpa to throw; akin...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/W/8

warp

1. To turn, twist, or be twisted out of shape; especially, to be twisted or bent out of a flat plane; as, a board warps in seasoning or shrinking. 'One of you will prove a shrunk panel, and, like green timber, warp, warp.' (Shak) 'They clamp one piece of wood to the end of another, to keep it from casting, or warping.' (Moxon) ... 2. To turn or inc...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Warp

A number of strong threads placed in parallel and stretching from end to end of the cloth piece, with the loom providing the tension for the warp.
Found on http://www.studiocrafts.com/Craftscapes/glossary.html

warp

Any variation from a true and plane surface. It includes bow, cup and twist and is often caused by irregular seasoning
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

WARP

Any variation from a true and plane surface. It includes bow, cup and twist and is often caused by irregular seasoning.
Found on http://www.glen-l.com/resources/glossary.html

warp

Any variation from a true surface. Or a rope used to tow a vessel and the process of towing.
Found on http://www.diy-wood-boat.com/Boating-terms.html

Warp

distorted lumber, such as a twist, cup or a bow.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary096.htm

Warp

Fiber bundles in a woven fabric that run parallel to the length of the loom, lengthwise along the long-dimension of the fabric.
Found on http://www.komprex.com/Glossary/index.htm

Warp

Heavier lines (rope or wire) used for mooring, anchoring and towing. May also be used to indicate moving (warping) a boat into position by pulling on a warp.
Found on http://www.sailinglinks.com/glossary.htm

Warp

Lengthwise yarns in woven fabrics.
Found on https://www.prestigeleisure.com/glossary-of-terms.asp

Warp

Not fabric itself, but refers to the vertical threads in fabric.
Found on http://www.bizchickblogs.com/2011/02/fashion-glossary-a-complete-guide-to-f

Warp

Severe bend in a piece of lumber or timber making it unusable in its original length. Sometimes the warp occurs mostly at one point, usually a knot, and short usable pieces can be cut on either side of that point.
Found on http://www.americantrails.org/
No exact match found