Stage

A complex developmental unit encompassing a broad span of time, wide spread of cultural unity, and cultural sequences.

stage

  1. any distinct time period in a sequence of events
  2. a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process
  3. a large platform on which people can stand and can be seen by an audience
  4. (usually
  5. any scene regarded as a setting for exhibiting or doing something
  6. a large coach-and-four formerly used to carry passengers and mail on regular routes between t......

    Stage

    1) The part of the theatre on which the actor performs. 2) The acting profession - an actor is said to be 'On The Stage'.

    Stage

    • (n.) One of several marked phases or periods in the development and growth of many animals and plants; as, the larval stage; pupa stage; zoea stage. • (n.) The platform of a microscope, upon which an object is placed to be viewed. See Illust. of Microscope. • (n.) The floor for scenic performances; hence, the theater; the playhouse...
    Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/stage/

    stage

    <oncology> The extent to which cancer has spread from its original site to other parts of the body. Usually denoted by a number from Stage 1 (least severe) to Stage 4 (more advanced). Different lymphoma types have different criteria for staging. ... (12 May 1997) ...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

    stage

    (from the article `Central Asian arts`) Before the introduction of Buddhism in shamanic Central Asia, there were no centres for the performing arts in the usual sense of the word. Each ... The typical Elizabethan stage was a platform, as large as 40 feet square (more than 12 metres on each side), sticking out into the middle of the yard...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/150

    stage

    (from the article `cervical cancer`) Once cervical cancer has been diagnosed, its stage is then determined. The stage is an indicator of how far the cancer has progressed. Stage 0 ... Once colorectal cancer has been diagnosed, its stage is then determined to indicate how far the cancer has progressed. Stage 0 colorectal cancer is ... ...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/150

    stage

    (from the article `geochronology`) The extensive review of the marine invertebrate fauna of the Paris Basin by Deshayes and Lyell not only made possible the formalization of the term ...
    Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/150

    stage

    (stāj) a distinct period or phase, as of development of a disease or organism. the platform of a microscope on which the slide containing the object to be studied is placed.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

    Stage

    (Stages) The size of a cancer and how far it has spread. Used to decide on the best course of treatment. There can be any number of stages, but for most cancers there are about four. Stage one is the smallest cancer and stage four (or the highest number) means the cancer has spread away from where it started to another part of the body.
    Found on http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/utilities/glossary/index.htm?search=s

    Stage

    1) In Reverberation Effects Devices, an echo added before the reverberation to simulate echoes that would come from a concert stage.
    2) In amplifiers, one section of components that has a particular function.
    3) The partially enclosed or raised area where live musicians perform.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

    stage

    noun a small platform on a microscope where the specimen is mounted for examination
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    stage

    leg noun a section or portion of a journey or course; `then we embarked on the second stage of our Caribbean cruise`
    Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

    Stage

    [cooking] Staging is an unpaid internship when a cook or chef works briefly, for free, in another chef`s kitchen to learn and be exposed to new techniques and cuisines. The term originates from the French word stagiaire meaning trainee, apprentice or intern. The French term commis is often used interchangeably with the aforementioned terms....
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stage_(cooking)

    Stage

    [hydrology] In hydrology, stage refers to the water level in a river or stream with respect to a chosen reference height. Stage is important because direct measurements of river discharge are very difficult while water surface elevation measurements are comparatively easy. In order to convert stage into discharge, scientists can use a combi...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stage_(hydrology)

    stage

    [Noun] A part of the Tour de France race.
    Example: The mountain stages are the most gruelling part of the Tour de France.
    Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

    Stage

    [stratigraphy] In chronostratigraphy, a stage is a succession of rock strata laid down in a single age on the geologic timescale, which usually represents millions of years of deposition. A given stage of rock and the corresponding age of time will by convention have the same name, and the same boundaries. Rock series are divided into stage...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stage_(stratigraphy)

    Stage

    [theatre] In theatre or performance arts, the stage (sometimes referred to as the deck in stagecraft) is a designated space for the performance of productions. The stage serves as a space for actors or performers and a focal point (the screen in cinema theaters) for the members of the audience. As an architectural feature, the stage may con...
    Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stage_(theatre)

    Stage

    Stage noun [ Old French estage , French étage , (assumed) Late Latin staticum , from Latin stare to stand. See Stand , and confer Static .] 1. A floor or story of a house. [ Obsolete] Wyclif. 2. An elevated platform on which an orat...
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/181

    Stage

    Stage transitive verb To exhibit upon a stage, or as upon a stage; to display publicly. Shak.
    Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/181

    Stage

    A distinct, sharply differentiated period in the development of an insect, e.g., egg stage, larval stage, pupal stage, adult stage; in mites and ticks, each instar.
    Found on http://www.earthlife.net/insects/glossary.html

    Stage

    A distinguishable period of growth and development of an insect, i.e., the larval stage of an insect.
    Found on http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/resources/health/field-guide/glossary.shtml

    Stage

    A particular level within the staged assessment of pupils` special educational needs. Each stage is characterised by the amount and variety of resources deployed to meet the special educational needs of pupils who are registered at that level.
    Found on http://www.education-support.org.uk/parents/special-education/glossary/

    stage

    A portion of a launch system that fires until its fuel supply is exhausted and then separates from the rest of the system. Related entry • staging
    Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/S/stage.html

    Stage

    A single process / rinse tank making up a station of one or more stages.
    Found on http://www.envirowise.gov.uk/206433
    No exact match found