Rotation

Applied to cropping, the practice of growing different crops on the same land in a regular, recurring sequence. Rotation is adopted to hinder the development or because of complement effects, or demands on the soil or for convenience of spreading the times of peak labour demand.

rotation

period between cutting successive crops of timber trees or coppice on the same piece of ground; the age to which a crop of wood is grown before cutting (E, 179)
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

Rotation

A rotation is a circular movement of an object around a center (or point) of rotation. A three-dimensional object always rotates around an imaginary line called a rotation axis. If the axis passes through the body`s center of mass, the body is said to rotate upon itself, or spin. A rotation about an external point, e.g. the Earth about the Sun, i....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotation

rotation

(from the article `joint`) Spin is a movement of a bone around its own long axis; it is denoted by the anatomical term rotation. An important example of spin is provided by the ... ...the two bones to which they are attached; extensors tend to increase the angle. Adductors pull a bone or cartilage closer to the axis of the body, ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/70

rotation

(from the article `sensory reception, human`) The human inner ear contains parts (the nonauditory labyrinth or vestibular organ) that are sensitive to acceleration in space, rotation, and ... ...is also essential for coordinating the position of the head and the movement of the eyes. There are two sets of end organs in the inner ear, or...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/70

rotation

(ro-ta´shәn) the process of turning around an axis. in obstetrics, the turning of the fetal head (or presenting part) for proper orientation to the pelvic axis. It should occur naturally, but if it does not it must be accomplished manually or instrumentally by the obstetrician or manually by the nurs...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

rotation

(ro-ta;shun) The movement of a bone around its own longitudinal axis.
Found on http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/abio/glossary.mhtml

rotation

[n] - (mathematics) a transformation in which the coordinate axes are rotated by a fixed angle about the origin 2. [n] - a single complete turn (axial or orbital) 3. [n] - a planned recurrent sequence (of crops or personnel etc.) 4. [n] - the act of rotating as if on an axis
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rotation

rotation

[2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/70

Rotation

• (a.) Pertaining to, or resulting from, rotation; of the nature of, or characterized by, rotation; as, rotational velocity. • (n.) The act of turning, as a wheel or a solid body on its axis, as distinguished from the progressive motion of a revolving round another body or a distant point; thus, the daily turning of the earth on its axis ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/rotation/

rotation

<dentistry> A movement in which the tooth turned along the long axis of the tooth. ... (08 Jan 1998) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

rotation

• (phys.) The turning or spinning of a body, such as a planet, star, or galaxy, about an axis running through it. See also rotational period. • (math.) A transformation in which a figure turns through a specific angle about a fixed point, called the center of rotation. The center of rot...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/R/rotation.html

rotation

rotary motion noun the act of rotating as if on an axis; `the rotation of the dancer kept time with the music`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=rotation

rotation

(physics) In astronomy, movement of a planet rotating about its own axis. For the Earth, one complete rotation takes 23 hours and 56 minutes. The Earth rotates in an anticlockwise direction (as viewed looking along its axis from north...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0096679.html

Rotation

[aeronautics] In aviation, rotation refers to the action of applying back pressure to a control device, such as a yoke, side-stick or centre stick, to lift the nose wheel off the ground during the takeoff roll. Proper rotation is important for safety reasons and to decrease takeoff distance. This is when the aircraft lifts up from the runwa...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotation_(aeronautics)

Rotation

[mathematics] Rotation in mathematics is a concept originating in geometry. Any rotation is a motion of a certain space that preserves at least one point. It can describe, for example, the motion of a rigid body around a fixed point. A rotation is different from other types of motions: translations, which have no fixed points, and (hyperpla...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotation_(mathematics)

Rotation

[music] In broadcasting, rotation is the repeated airing of a limited playlist of songs on a radio station or satellite radio channel, or music videos on a TV network. They are usually in a different order each time, however they are not completely shuffled, so as to avoid playing the same song again too long or short apart. Stations playin...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotation_(music)

Rotation

[pool] Rotation, sometimes called rotation pool or 61, is a pocket billiards game, requiring a standard pool table, {Cuegloss|Cue ball|cue ball} and triangular rack of fifteen pool balls, in which the lowest-numbered {Cuegloss|Object ball|object ball} on the table must be always struck by the cue ball first, to attempt to {Cuegloss|Pocket|p...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotation_(pool)

Rotation

Ro·ta'tion adjective Pertaining to, or resulting from, rotation; of the nature of, or characterized by, rotation; as, rotational velocity.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/95

Rotation

Ro·ta'tion noun [ Latin rotatio : confer French rotation .] 1. The act of turning, as a wheel or a solid body on its axis, as distinguished from the progressive motion of a revolving round another body or a distant point; thus, the daily turning of the earth on its axis is a ro...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/95

rotation

A shelf-stocking procedure that ensures first-in, first-out by pulling older stock forward and placing newer stock at the back during restocking. See stock rotation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20108

Rotation

An active asset management strategy that tactically overweighted and underweighted certain sectors, depending on expected performance. Sometimes called sector rotation.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosr.htm

Rotation

An active asset management strategy that tactically overweighted and underweighted certain sectors,
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22402

Rotation

Call auction method used on an option exchange by which all of the option series in a particular underlying are opened. Discover What It`s Like to Live Easy With EquiTrend
Found on http://www.equitrend.com/glossary3460.xhtml

Rotation

Changing crops in a field an an annual basis to maximise yield and minimise disease, soil damage etc.
Found on http://www.lethamshank.co.uk/glossary/glossary.php?letter=R
No exact match found