road

a human-made feature of the land that facilitates the movement of people and goods from one place to another

Road

A road is a thoroughfare, route, or way on land between two places, which has been paved or otherwise improved to allow travel by some conveyance, including a horse, cart, or motor vehicle. Roads consist of one, or sometimes two, roadways (British English: carriageways) each with one or more lanes and also any associated sidewalks (British English...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road

road

[n] - an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation 2. [n] - a way or means to achieve something
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=road

Road

• (n.) An inroad; an invasion; a raid. • (n.) A journey, or stage of a journey. • (n.) A place where one may ride; an open way or public passage for vehicles, persons, and animals; a track for travel, forming a means of communication between one city, town, or place, and another. • (n.) A place where ships may ride at anchor at ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/road/

road

route noun an open way (generally public) for travel or transportation
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=road

Road

[hieroglyph] The Ancient Egyptian Road-with-shrubs hieroglyph is Gardiner sign listed no. N31 for a road, `street`, or pathway. It originally was a curving hieroglyph, but became a standardized straight form as well. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road_(hieroglyph)

Road

[sports] Road game or away game is a sports game where the specified team is not the host and must travel to another venue. Most professional teams represent cities or towns and amateur sports teams often represent academic institutions. Each team has a location where it practices during the season and where it hosts games. When a team is n...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road_(sports)

Road

Road noun [ Anglo-Saxon rād a riding, that on which one rides or travels, a road, from rīdan to ride. See Ride , and confer Raid .] 1. A journey, or stage of a journey. [ Obsolete] « With easy roads he came to Leicester.» Shak....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/87

road

1. A journey, or stage of a journey. 'With easy roads he came to Leicester.' (Shak) ... 2. An inroad; an invasion; a raid. ... 3. A place where one may ride; an open way or public passage for vehicles, persons, and animals; a track for travel, forming a means of communication between one city, town, or place, and another. 'The most villainous house...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Road

A very hard and flat pitch, good for batting on.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_cricket_terms

road

road, strip of land used for transportation. The history of roads has been related to the centralizing of populations in powerful cities, which the roads have served for military purposes and for trade, the collection of supplies, and tribute. In the Middle East, in N Mesopotamia, scientists have fo...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0842038.html

Road

Slang: Localised area, alternative to 'from the streets' -Usage: 'Kano is big on road' - Other terms Endz, yard
Found on http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article1949469.ece

road

Specially constructed route for wheeled vehicles to travel on. Reinforced tracks became necessary with the invention of wheeled vehicles in about 3000 BC and most ancient civilizations had some form...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

road

Specially constructed route for wheeled vehicles to travel on. Reinforced tracks became necessary with the invention of wheeled vehicles in about 3000 BC and most ancient civilizations had some form of road network. Early history The first major road was the Persian Royal Road from the Gulf to the Aegean Sea, more than 2,800 km/4,480 mi long, u...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0029177.html

road

the traveled way on which people, animals, or wheeled vehicles move. In modern usage the term road describes a rural, lesser traveled way, while the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/55
No exact match found