rack

  1. framework for holding objects
  2. rib section of a forequarter of veal or pork or especially lamb or mutton
  3. the destruction or collapse of something
  4. an instrument of torture that stretches or disjoints or mutilates victims
  5. a support for displaying various articles
  6. a rapid gait of a horse in which each foot strikes the ground separately
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Rack

[Web server interface] Reader Reply No. 4 from the 9 September 1989 issue of New Scientist. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rack_(Web_server_interface)

Rack

To steal, usually paints or markers. In the past, most writers stole all materials used for painting. Due to paint lockups in California and other areas, this is no longer possible, so most paint is now bought.
Found on http://www.graffiti.org/faq/graffiti.glossary.html

rack

A floor or counter display unit with shelves and hooks for merchandise.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20108

rack

[n] - rib section of a forequarter of veal or pork or especially lamb or mutton 2. [n] - an instrument of torture that stretches or disjoints or mutilates victims 3. [n] - framework for holding objects 4. [n] - a support for displaying various articles 5. [n] - a rapid gait of a horse in which each foot strikes the ground sep...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=rack

Rack

A cabinet of standard width (19') into which various components can be bolted. Racks are ideal for touring equipment, are neat, and they allow easy access to the rear and front panels.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20447

Rack

Plastic, wooden or metal tray to place rows of poker chips.
Found on http://www.thegoodgamblingguide.co.uk/glossary/casinoglossary.htm

Rack

The electrically conductive frame onto which the work is manually mounted, and which, in turn is attached to the transporter flight bar. It is sometimes called a jig.
Found on http://www.envirowise.gov.uk/206433

Rack

Rack (răk) noun Same as Arrack .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/2

Rack

Rack noun [ Anglo-Saxon hracca neck, hinder part of the head; confer Anglo-Saxon hraca throat, German rachen throat, English retch .] The neck and spine of a fore quarter of veal or mutton.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/2

Rack

Rack intransitive verb To fly, as vapor or broken clouds.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/2

Rack

Rack transitive verb [ Confer Old French vin raqué wine squeezed from the dregs of the grapes.] To draw off from the lees or sediment, as wine. « It is in common practice to draw wine or beer from the lees (which we call racking ), whereby it will clarify much the sooner.» ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/R/2

rack

1. An instrument or frame used for stretching, extending, retaining, or displaying, something. Specifically: An engine of torture, consisting of a large frame, upon which the body was gradually stretched until, sometimes, the joints were dislocated; formerly used judicially for extorting confessions from criminals or suspected persons. 'During the ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

rack

single-foot noun a rapid gait of a horse in which each foot strikes the ground separately
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Rack

• (a.) A frame or table on which ores are separated or washed. • (a.) An engine of torture, consisting of a large frame, upon which the body was gradually stretched until, sometimes, the joints were dislocated; -- formerly used judicially for extorting confessions from criminals or suspected persons. • (n.) The neck and spine of a fo...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/rack/

rack

(from the article `walk`) ...controlled by the rider`s handling of the reins. This gait also requires impulsion, produced by pressure of the rider`s legs on the horse`s sides. ... There are a number of disconnected and intermediate gaits, some done only by horses bred to perform them. One is the rack, a four-beat gait, with ... [2 re...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/2

rack

a bedlike open frame suspended above the ground that was used as a torture device. The victim`s ankles and wrists were secured by ropes that passed ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/r/2

Rack

Rack was formerly American slang (it's now conventional language) for a bed or bunk.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZR.HTM

Rack

[web server interface] Rack provides a minimal, modular and adaptable interface for developing web applications in Ruby. By wrapping HTTP requests and responses in the simplest way possible, it unifies and distills the API for web servers, web frameworks, and software in between (the so-called middleware) into a single method call. Rack is ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rack_(web_server_interface)

Rack

The name for climbing gear found on the harness and gear loops which may include items such as nuts, cams, hexs, quickdraws and karabiners.
Found on http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/glossary

Rack

A frame carrying film in a processing machine. Ofter used to refer to frame edit alignment in which the projected film remains properly framed on the screen (in rack). (Laboratory)
Found on http://www.filmland.com/glossary/Dictionary.html#A

Rack

A term for an E.I.A. compatible closure for holding rackmount (19' width) components.
Found on http://www.starcase.com/glossary.html

rack

A unit of timber where each layer is separated and spaced for drying with rack sticks
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

Rack

A single or multi-level structural storage system that is utilized to support high stacking of single items or palletized loads
Found on http://www.mhia.org/learning/glossary/r

Rack

An engine with which to torture a supposed criminal, in order to extort a confession of his supposed crime, and the names of his supposed accomplices. Unknown in the United States. This instrument, known by the nickname of the Duke of Exeter's daughter, was in use in England.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/q094.htm
No exact match found