pipe

a long, hollow cylinder, usually steel, through which fluids are conducted. Oilfield tubular goods are casing (including liners), drill pipe, tubing, or line pipe

pipe

Tube-like, cylindrical body of igneous rock.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22291

Pipe

• (v. t.) To call or direct, as a crew, by the boatswain`s whistle. • (n.) The key or sound of the voice. • (n.) A wind instrument of music, consisting of a tube or tubes of straw, reed, wood, or metal; any tube which produces musical sounds; as, a shepherd`s pipe; the pipe of an organ. • (n.) The bagpipe; as, the pipes of Luckn...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/pipe/

Pipe

(aka Port Pipe) A large barrel, made from oak and used to mature alcoholic beverages. A pipe is of roughly the same size as a butt (105 gallons/477.3 litres), though the size varies depending on the industry. For example, a Port Pipe is roughly 115 gallons, as opposed a standard Madeira pipe, of just 92 gallons.
Found on http://www.masterofmalt.com/whisky-glossary/

pipe

(from the article `building construction`) Perhaps the most important use of lead was for pipes to supply fresh water to buildings and to remove wastewater from them (the word plumbing comes ... ...which are free of contamination. Water is drawn from the wells with small submersible electric pumps, which are lowered through the well cas...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/71

pipe

1. A wind instrument of music, consisting of a tube or tubes of straw, reed, wood, or metal; any tube which produces musical sounds; as, a shepherd's pipe; the pipe of an organ. 'Tunable as sylvan pipe.' 'Now had he rather hear the tabor and the pipe.' (Shak) ... 2. Any long tube or hollow body of wood, metal, earthenware, or the like: especially, ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

pipe

noun a small fipple flute that is played with the left hand while the right hand is free to beat a tabor
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

pipe

pipage noun a long tube made of metal or plastic that is used to carry water or oil or gas etc.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Pipe

[car] Pipe was a Belgian automobile manufacturer founded by the brothers Alfred and Victor Goldschmidt. The company was also known as `Compagnie Belge de Construction Automobiles`. In 1900 they presented their first car in Brussels under the name `Pipe`. This model was similar to cars made by Panhard & Levassor. This `Pipe` car was powered ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_(car)

Pipe

[casting] Currently, due to lack of interest, this collaboration page is closed. It is kept for archival purposes until enough interest stirs for a larger collaboration. Until then, see here for the this month`s collaboration for WP Dylan. == This Month`s Collaboration == This Month`s (October) Collaboration - `Like a Rolling Stone` Goals (...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_(casting)

Pipe

[fluid conveyance] A pipe is a tubular section or hollow cylinder, usually but not necessarily of circular cross-section, used mainly to convey substances which can flow — liquids and gases (fluids), slurries, powders, masses of small solids. It can also be used for structural applications; hollow pipe is far stiffer per unit weight than ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_(fluid_conveyance)

Pipe

[instrument] Pipe describes a number of musical instruments, historically referring to perforated wind instruments. The word is an onomatopoeia, and comes from the tone which can resemble that of a bird chirping. ==Folk pipe== Fipple flutes are found in many cultures around the world. Often with six holes, the shepherd`s pipe is a common pa...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_(instrument)

Pipe

Pipe intransitive verb 1. To play on a pipe, fife, flute, or other tubular wind instrument of music. « We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced.» Matt. xi. 17. 2. (Nautical) To call, convey orders, etc., by means of signals on a pipe or whistle ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/93

Pipe

Pipe noun [ Anglo-Saxon pīpe , probably from Latin pipare , pipire , to chirp; of imitative origin. Confer Peep , Pibroch , Fife .] 1. A wind instrument of music, consisting of a tube or tubes of straw, reed, wood, or metal; any tube which prod...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/93

Pipe

Pipe transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Piped ; present participle & verbal noun Piping .] 1. To perform, as a tune, by playing on a pipe, flute, fife, etc.; to utter in the shrill tone of a pipe. « A robin . . . ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/93

Pipe

A ball set toward the middle of the court for a back-row attack.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary184.htm

Pipe

A cask holding two hogsheads or 126 U.S
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary092.htm

Pipe

A cask holding two hogsheads or 126 U.S. gallons of wine.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20673

Pipe

A cylindrical loop affixed to the underside of a barrel, to retain a ramrod.
Found on http://www.hallowellco.com/abbrevia.htm

Pipe

A goal post.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22383

Pipe

A hollow cylinder of metal used for the conveyance of water or gas or used as a structural column which comes in sizes of standard, extra strong and double-extra strong.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

Pipe

A large barrel or cask used for storing, transporting or aging wine, especially dessert wine. Pipes vary in size between about 110 and 140 U.S. gallons.
Found on http://richardgrantwine.com/wineglossary.html

pipe

a passage provided to guide the coolant
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=411-44-11

Pipe

A pipe was a British measure of cider equivalent to between 100 and 118 gallons.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AP.HTM

pipe

A tubular cavity projecting as much as several metres down from the surface into karst rocks and often filled with earth, sand, gravel, breccia, etc.
Found on http://www.cancaver.ca/docs/glossary.htm
No exact match found