malachite

Bright green stone with bandings and circular markings in dark and pale green. It is found mainly in Russia, and used for table tops, veneers, vases and inlaid decoration, and in jewellery, either carved or cabochon cut. The Russian jeweller fabergé used the stone extensively. See jewel cutting.

Malachite

Malachite is a copper carbonate hydroxide mineral, with the formula Cu2CO3(OH)2. This opaque, green banded mineral crystallizes in the monoclinic crystal system, and most often forms botryoidal, fibrous, or stalagmitic masses, in fractures and spaces, deep underground, where the water table and hydrothermal fluids provide the means for chemical pr...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malachite

malachite

[n] - a green mineral used as an ore of copper and for making ornamental objects
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=malachite

Malachite

• (n.) Native hydrous carbonate of copper, usually occurring in green mammillary masses with concentric fibrous structure.
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malachite

<chemical> Native hydrous carbonate of copper, usually occurring in green mammillary masses with concentric fibrous structure. ... Green malachite, or malachite proper, admits of a high polish, and is sometimes used for ornamental work. Blue malachite, or azurite, is a related species of a deep blue colour. Malachite green. See Emerald green,...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

malachite

noun a green or blue mineral used as an ore of copper and for making ornamental objects
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=malachite

Malachite

Mal'a¬∑chite noun [ Fr. Greek ... a mallow, from its resembling the green color of the leaf of mallows: confer French malachite . Confer Mallow .] (Min.) Native hydrous carbonate of copper, usually occurring in green mammillary masses with concentric fibrous structure. » G...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/10

malachite

a minor ore but a widespread mineral of copper, basic copper carbonate, Cu2CO3(OH)2. Because of its distinctive bright green colour and its presence ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/18

malachite

Common copper ore, basic copper carbonate, Cu2CO3(OH)2. It is a source of green pigment and is used as an antifungal agent in fish farming, as well as being polished for use in jewellery, ornaments, and art objects
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006425.html

Malachite

Copper(II) carbonate, basic
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary075.htm

malachite

malachite (măl'ukīt) , a mineral, the green basic carbonate of copper occurring in crystals of the monoclinic system or (more usually) in masses. It is translucent or opaque; the luster is silky, vitreous, adamantine, or dull. It takes a good polish. An important ore of copper, it al...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0831309.html

Malachite

Malachite is a native hydrous carbonate of copper, usually occurring in green mammillary masses with concentric fibrous structure. It is a widely distributed copper ore. Found in the oxidized portions of copper veins and is often associated with cuprite, native copper, iron oxides, and sulphides of copper and iron. It often occurs in copper veins t...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/HM.HTM

Malachite

Malachite is an opaque green sometimes banded mineral that is used in jewellery as well as for other purposes. As a copper carbonate, it can usually be found throughout copper deposits and limestone's.
Found on http://www.studiojewellery.com.au/jewellery-glossary-m.html

Malachite

The Malachite was an Italian Gemma Class coastal submarine of 615 tons displacement launched in 1936. The Malachite was powered by diesel engines providing a top speed of 14 knots surfaced and 8.5 knots submerged and could dive to a depth of 50 fathoms. Armaments consisted of one 3.9 inch gun; two 13 mm anti-aircraft guns and six 21 inch torpedo tu...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RM.HTM
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