homeostasis

(= homoeostasis) The tendency towards a relatively constant state. A variety of homoeostatic mechanisms operate to keep the properties of the internal environment of organisms within fairly well-defined limits.

Homeostasis

In medicine and biology, this term is applied to the inherent tendency in an organism toward maintenance of physiological and psychological stability.

Homeostasis

Maintenance of constancy or a high degree of uniformity in functions of an organism or interactions of individuals in a population or community under changing conditions, because of the capabilities of organisms to make adjustments.

Homeostasis

control of an organism`s internal environment. Water content, temperature, acid-base balance, level of oxygen and carbon dioxide, adequate supply of energy are some of the many factors in the organism which require monitoring and control. A common form of control is feedback.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20169

Homeostasis

Our body's natural state is one of internal balance or homeostasis. Regards flight or flight, when the danger is over the parasympathetic branch of our autonomic nervous system, antagonistic to the sympathetic branch, returns our body to its more natural state of homeostasis, or internal balance. Imagine what would happen without this!
Found on http://www.gerardkeegan.co.uk/glossary/gloss_a.htm

homeostasis

[n] - metabolic equilibrium actively maintained by several complex biological mechanisms that operate via the autonomic nervous system to offset disrupting changes
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=homeostasis

Homeostasis

The maintenance of constant internal conditions (mainly of the body fluids) in the face of changing activity and external conditions, to provide optimum conditions for enzyme activity of metabolism. Controlled by negative feed-back loops, in which any change away from the 'goal state' is opposed. The 'ideal state' is never reached, and the metaboli...
Found on http://www.felpress.co.uk/Exercise_Physiology_Glossary.24.0.html

homeostasis

Normal, internal stability in an organism maintained by co-ordinated responses of the organ systems that automatically compensate for environmental changes.
Found on http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/iupacglossary/glossaryh.html

Homeostasis

In medicine and biology, this term is applied to the inherent tendency in an organism toward maintenance of physiological and psychological stability.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/881-Homeostasis

Homeostasis

the body's co-ordinated maintenance of the stable, internal environment by regulating blood pressure, blood sugar, body temperature, etc
Found on http://www.medichecks.com/glossary.cfm?ltr=H

Homeostasis

Automatic self-regulation to maintain the normal or standard state of the body
Found on http://www.dwp.gov.uk/medical/med_conditions/glossary.html

Homeostasis

Equilibrium of internal environment.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20900

Homeostasis

The system whereby body functions (temperature, blood pressure, etc) remain in equilibrium whatever the outside environment.
Found on http://www.gadsbywicks.co.uk/uploaded/3822.pdf

Homeostasis

Maintenance of relatively constant internal conditions in the face of a varying external environment.
Found on http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/Townsend/Glossary/GlossaryH.html

homeostasis

<physiology> A tendency to stability in the normal body states (internal environment) of the organism. It is achieved by a system of control mechanisms activated by negative feedback, for example a high level of carbon dioxide in extracellular fluid triggers increased pulmonary ventilation, which in turn causes a decrease in carbon dioxide co...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

homeostasis

(ho″me-o-sta┬┤sis) the tendency of a biological system to maintain relatively constant conditions in its internal environment while it continuously interacts with and adjusts to changes on the outside. Through homeostatic mechanisms, the human body maintains body temperature, the osmotic pressure of the blood, and ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

homeostasis

any self-regulating process by which biological systems tend to maintain stability while adjusting to conditions that are optimal for survival. If ... [24 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/65

homeostasis

(homeo- + Gr. stasis standing) a tendency to stability in the normal body states (internal environment) of the organism. It is achieved by a system of control mechanisms activated by negative feedback; e.g. a high level of carbon dioxide in extracellular fluid triggers increased pulmonary ventilation, which in turn causes a decrease in carbon dio.....
Found on http://users.ugent.be/~rvdstich/eugloss/DIC/dictio39.html

homeostasis

homeostasis 1. A state of equilibrium or a tendency to reach equilibrium, either metabolically within a cell or organism or socially and psychologically within an individual or group. 2. The ability or tendency of an organism or a cell to maintain internal equilibrium by adjusting its physiological processes. 3. The processes used to maintain suc...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/996/

Homeostasis

- control of an organism`s internal environment. Water content, temperature, acid-base balance, level of oxygen and carbon dioxide, adequate supply of energy are some of the many factors in the organism which require monitoring and control. A common form of control is feedback.
Found on http://www.eclipse.co.uk/moordent/page5.html

homeostasis

The self-regulating mechanisms whereby by biological systems attempt to maintain a stable internal conditions (e.g., blood pressure, body temperature, acid-base balance) in the face of changes in the external environment. It was the 19th-century French physiologist Claude Bernard who first realized ...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/H/homeostasis.html

homeostasis

Type: Term Pronunciation: hō′mē-ō-stā′sis, -os′tă-sis Definitions: 1. The state of equilibrium (balance between opposing pressures) in the body with respect to various functions and to the chemical compositions of the fluids and tissues. 2. The processes through which such bodily equilibrium is maintained....
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=41309

homeostasis

Maintenance of a constant environment within and around living cells, particularly with regard to pH, salt concentration, temperature, and blood sugar levels. Stable conditions are important for the efficient functioning of the enzyme reactions within the cells. In humans, homeostasis in the blood (w...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0008030.html

Homeostasis

The tendency of an organism toward stability in the normal body states.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21420

homeostasis

(ho;me-o-sta;sis) The dynamic constancy of the internal environment, the maintenance of which is the principal function of physiological regulatory mechanisms. The concept of homeostasis provides a framework for understanding most physiological processes.
Found on http://www.mhhe.com/biosci/abio/glossary.mhtml
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