drift

1. an ocean current's speed of motion. 2. an observed change, usually uncontrolled, in meter performance, meter factor, etc., that occurs over a period of time. v:1. to move slowly out of alignment, off center, or out of register. 2. gauge or measure pipe by means of a mandrel passed through it to ensure the passage of tools, pumps, and so on.

Drift

Movement of droplets/dust in natural air currents beyond the intended area of application.

Drift

The length of the suspension wire between the counterweight bar and the top of the piece to be flown.

Drift

Material of any sort deposited by geological processes in one place after having been removed from another. Glacial drift includes the materials deposited by glaciers and by the stream and lakes associated with them.
Found on http://www.americantrails.org/

Drift

[Transformers] Drift is the name of three different fictional characters in the Transformers franchise. For trademark reasons, toys related to the character are marketed under the name Autobot Drift. ==Transformers: Armada== Drift is the name of the Mini-Con Dirt Boss in the Japanese version of Transformers: Armada. ==Transformers: Generati...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drift_(Transformers)

Drift

A horizontal passage underground that is .excavated along a rich vein of ore. Used in hard rock mining.
Found on http://www.legendsofamerica.com/

Drift

when a pesticide is blown by wind onto nontarget organisms.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20003

Drift

A design term generally attributed to Gertrude Jekyll. To express a feeling in with plants. The technique is to plant flowers thicker in the center and further apart on the outskirts.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20077

Drift

An archaic term for heterogeneous sediment (presumed to be deposited by drifting icebergs, perhaps in Noah's flood!). Includes and retained in stratified drift, but not in till.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20131

drift

[n] - a process of linguistic change over a period of time 2. [n] - the gradual departure from an intended course due to external influences (as a ship or plane) 3. [n] - a force that moves something along 4. [n] - something heaped up by the wind or current 5. [n] - a general tendency to change (as of opinion) 6. [n] - ge...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=drift

Drift

An unexpected change in output under constant load conditions.
Found on http://www.appmeas.co.uk/glossary.html

Drift

Small variations in a measured parameter over a period of time
Found on http://www.amplicon.co.uk/info/glossary.cfm

Drift

Motion of carriers caused by an electric field.orSlow variation of a performance characteristic such as gain, frequency, or power output; for instance, due to temperature or aging.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/d/r/drift/source.html

Drift

The movement of an aeroplane in a horizontal plane through the influence of a cross-wind. Drift makes necessary the deflection of the longitudinal axis of the aeroplane away from the line of track to be followed. That is to say an aeroplane must be headed slightly towards a beam wind to avoid being drifted off its course.
Found on http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/glossary/

Drift

A change of a reading or a set point value over long periods due to several factors including change in ambient temperature, time, and line voltage.
Found on http://www.flowmeterdirectory.com/flowmeter_technical_glossary/flowmeter_te

Drift

Drift noun [ From drive ; akin to LG. & Dutch drift a driving, Icelandic drift snowdrift, Danish drift , impulse, drove, herd, pasture, common, German trift pasturage, drove. See Drive .] 1. A driving; a violent movement. « The dragon drew him ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/122

Drift

Drift intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Drifted ; present participle & verbal noun Drifting .] 1. To float or be driven along by, or as by, a current of water or air; as, the ship drifted astern; a raft dr...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/122

Drift

Drift transitive verb 1. To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body. J. H. Newman. 2. To drive into heaps; as, a current of wind drifts snow or sand. 3. (Machinery) To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/122

Drift

Drift adjective That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud. Kane. Drift anchor . See Sea anchor , and also Drag sail , under Drag , noun -...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/122

drift

Collectively, stream invertebrates (almost wholly the aquatic larval stages of insects) that voluntarily or accidentally leave the substrate to move or float with the current, as well as terrestrial invertebrates that drop into the stream. Also, any detrital material transported in the water current. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

drift

purport noun the pervading meaning or tenor; `caught the general drift of the conversation`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=drift

drift

movement noun a general tendency to change (as of opinion); `not openly liberal but that is the trend of the book`; `a broad movement of the electorate to the right`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=drift

drift

(drift) slow movement away from the normal or original position. a chance variation, as in gene frequency from one generation to another; the smaller the population, the greater the chance of random variations. antigenic drift relatively minor changes in the antigenic ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Drift

• (n.) A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel. • (v. i.) To float or be driven along by, or as by, a current of water or air; as, the ship drifted astern; a raft drifted ashore; the balloon drifts slowly east. • (n.) That which is driven, forced, or urged along &bu...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/drift/

drift

(from the article `continental landform`) Theoretical matters were complicated further by suggestions during the 19th century that iceberg rafting of gravel during Noah`s Flood accounted for ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/75
No exact match found