dance

  1. an artistic form of nonverbal communication
  2. taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music

Dance

Dance is a rhythmic movement of the body usually performed to music.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VD.HTM

dance

[n] - a party of people assembled for dancing 2. [n] - a party for social dancing 3. [n] - an artistic form of nonverbal communication 4. [v] - skip, leap, or move up and down or sideways 5. [v] - move in a graceful and rhythmical way 6. [v] - move in a pattern
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=dance

dance

In Hindu tradition, the world was created by Shiva, whose aspects include Lord of the Dance, and dance often forms part of worship in a temple, along with music and songs of praise (
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Dance

Dance (dȧns) intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Danced ; present participle & verbal noun Dancing .] [ French danser , from Old High German dansōn to draw; akin to dinsan to draw, Goth. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/5

Dance

Dance transitive verb To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about, or up and down; to dandle. « To dance our ringlets to the whistling wind.» Shak. « Thy grandsire loved thee well; Many a time he danced thee on his knee.» Shak. To danc...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/5

Dance

Dance noun [ French danse , of German origin. See Dance , intransitive verb ] 1. The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by art, in figures and in accord with music.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/5

dance

1. To move with measured steps, or to a musical accompaniment; to go through, either alone or in company with others, with a regulated succession of movements, (commonly) to the sound of music; to trip or leap rhytmically. 'Jack shall pipe and Gill shall dance.' (Wiher) 'Good shepherd, what fair swain is this Which dances with your dauther?' (Shak)...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

dance

noun an artistic form of nonverbal communication
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=dance

dance

noun a party for social dancing
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=dance

dance

noun a party of people assembled for dancing
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=dance

dance

trip the light fantastic verb move in a pattern; usually to musical accompaniment; do or perform a dance; `My husband and I like to dance at home to the radio`
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=dance

Dance

• (v. t.) To cause to dance, or move nimbly or merrily about, or up and down; to dandle. • (v. i.) To move nimbly or merrily; to express pleasure by motion; to caper; to frisk; to skip about. • (v. i.) The leaping, tripping, or measured stepping of one who dances; an amusement, in which the movements of the persons are regulated by a...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dance/

dance

(from the article `hymenopteran`) The highly integrated activities of the Hymenoptera colony require sophisticated methods of passing information among its members. The so-called ... ...to maintain this partnership is initiated and continued by a series of displays that, since they often consist of two birds facing each other and ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/6

dance

the movement of the body in a rhythmic way, usually to music and within a given space, for the purpose of expressing an idea or emotion, releasing ... [66 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/6

Dance

Dance is old British slang for a flight of stairs.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZD.HTM

Dance

Dance is old British slang for a flight of stairs.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZD.HTM

Dance

Dance can be used to teach coordination and discipline. Dancing in groups encourages students to become more observant and strengthens social bonds. Memorization of lengthy dance routines and the music associated with them stimulates parts of the brain involved with creativity.
Found on http://glossary.plasmalink.com/glossary.html

dance

dance [Old High Ger. danson=to drag, stretch], the art of precise, expressive, and graceful human movement, traditionally, but not necessarily, performed in accord with musical accompaniment. Dancing developed as a natural expression of united feeling and action.Sections in this article:Introduction...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0814600.html

Dance

The art of following musical rhythm with the movement of the human body. It is considered the most elementary art because the product is not detached from the body of the artist. -- L.V.
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/d.html

Dance

Type: Term Pronunciation: dants Definitions: 1. Jean B.H., French physician, 1797-1832. See: Dance sign
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=22849

dance

Type: Term Pronunciation: dants Definitions: 1. Involuntary movements related to brain damage.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=22850

dance

Click images to enlargeRhythmic movement of the body, usually performed in time to music. Its primary purpose may be religious, magical, martial, social, or artistic – the last two being characteristic of nontraditional societies. The pre-Christian era had a strong tradition of ritual dance, and ancient Greek dan...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0000754.html

dance

(Hindu worship) In Hindu tradition, the world was created by Shiva, whose aspects include Lord of the Dance, and dance often forms part of worship in a temple, along with music and songs of praise (bhajan and kirtan). Worshippers may dance spontaneously, or there may be more formal dances by t...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0097381.html

dance

a series of rhythmic and patterned bodily movements usually performed to music.
Found on http://www.centralhome.com/dance-terms-d.htm
No exact match found