cavalier

  1. a gallant or courtly gentleman
  2. a royalist supporter of Charles I during the English Civil War

Cavalier

Raised structure containing a battery, usually sited above the centre of a bastion. Raising the battery gives a better trajectory.

Cavalier

Cavalier is British slang for an uncircumcised male.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZC.HTM

Cavalier

HMS Cavalier was a British C Class destroyer of 1710 tons displacement launched in 1944. HMS Cavalier was powered by two Admiralty 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 34 knots and carried a crew of 186. She was armed with four 4.5 inch dual-purpose guns; four 40 mm anti-aircraft guns; six 20 mm anti-aircraft guns; four 21-inch torpedo tube...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RC.HTM

Cavalier

[Dungeons & Dragons] The cavalier is a playable character class in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, and the related Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. A cavalier is a mounted warrior mostly in the service of good. ==Publication history== ===Advanced Dungeons & Dragons 1st edition (1977-1988)=== The cavalier was introduced by Gary...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalier_(Dungeons_&_Dragons)

Cavalier

Cavalier is British slang for an uncircumcised male.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZC.HTM

Cavalier

[adj] - given to haughty disregard of others 2. [n] - a gallant or courtly gentleman 3. [n] - a royalist supporter of Charles I during the English Civil War
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Cavalier

cavalier

Horseman of noble birth, but mainly used as a derogatory nickname to describe a male supporter of Charles I in the English Civil War (Cavalier), typically with courtly dress and long hair (as...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Cavalier

British cruiser tank [UK]
Found on http://www.jedsite.info/index.html

Cavalier

Cav`a·lier' (kăv`ȧ*lēr') noun [ French cavalier , Italian cavaliere , Late Latin caballarius , from Latin caballus . See Cavalcade , and confer Chevalier , Caballine .] 1. A military man serving on horseback; a knight. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/40

Cavalier

Cav`a·lier' adjective Gay; easy; offhand; frank. « The plodding, persevering scupulous accuracy of the one, and the easy, cavalier , verbal fluency of the other, form a complete contrast. Hazlitt. » 2. High-spirited. [ Obsolete] 'The people are naturally not valiant...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/40

cavalier

high-handed adjective given to haughty disregard of others
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cavalier

cavalier

chevalier noun a gallant or courtly gentleman
Found on http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn?s=cavalier

Cavalier

• (a.) High-spirited. • (n.) A gay, sprightly, military man; hence, a gallant. • (a.) Of or pertaining to the party of King Charles I. • (a.) Gay; easy; offhand; frank. • (n.) A military man serving on horseback; a knight. • (n.) A work of more than ordinary height, rising from the level ground of a bastion, etc., and ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cavalier/

Cavalier

(from the article `cavalier`) In the English Civil Wars (1642–51), the name was adopted by Charles I`s supporters, who contemptuously called their opponents Roundheads; at the ... ...also passed for religious reasons, reflecting the mid-century Civil Wars in England. In America, as in England, plain dress and rich dress became, ......
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/39

cavalier

(from Late Latin caballarius, `horseman`), originally a rider or cavalryman; the term had the same derivation as the French chevalier. In English ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/39

cavalier

cavalier 1. An armed horseman; especially, a mounted soldier; a knight. 2. Someone having the spirit or bearing of a knight; a courtly gentleman; gallant. 3. A gallant or courteous gentleman; especially, one serving as a lady's escort. 4. Historically, when capitalized, an adherent of Charles I of England in his contest with Parliament. 5. Showin...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/396/

cavalier

cavalier (kăv"ulir') , in general, an armed horseman. In the English civil war the supporters of Charles I were called Cavaliers in contradistinction to the Roundheads, the followers of Parliament. The royalists used the designation until it was replaced by Tory.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0810938.html

Cavalier

Cavalier was a word meaning a horseman, whence a knight and a gentleman. In monarchical France the term 'chevalier' was a title of honour. The name was given to the followers of Charles I in derision in 1641 but afterwards became known in a more complimentary sense. During the Exclusion Bill of 1679 the term gave way to Tory.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXC.HTM

Cavalier

In fortifications, a cavalier is an elevation of earth of different shapes, situated ordinarily in the gorge of a bastion, bordered with a parapet, and cut into more or less embrasures, according to the capacity of the cavalier.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/FC.HTM

cavalier

Horseman of noble birth, but mainly used as a derogatory nickname to describe a male supporter of Charles I in the English Civil War (Cavalier), typically with courtly dress and long hair (as distinct from a Roundhead); also a supporter of Charles II after the Restoration
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0009441.html

Cavalier

[N&W train] The Cavalier was one of the named passenger trains of the Norfolk and Western Railway. Originally running from Norfolk, Virginia to Cincinnati, Ohio, by 1957 trains 15 and 16 had been cut back to a Petersburg, Virginia to Portsmouth, Ohio run. Service to Norfolk was maintained by combining train 15 with train 27, and train 16 wi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalier_(N&W_train)

Cavalier

[fortification] The term Cavalier has been adopted from the French as a term in fortification for a work of great height constructed in the interior of a fort, bastion or other defence, so as to fire over the main parapet without interfering with the fire of the latter. A greater volume of fire can thus be obtained, but the great height of ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalier_(fortification)

Cavalier

[magazine] Cavalier is an American magazine that was launched by Fawcett Publications in 1952 and has continued for decades, eventually evolving into a Playboy-style men`s magazine. It has no connection with the Frank Munsey pulp, The Cavalier, published in the early years of the 20th century. In its original format, Cavalier was planned by...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalier_(magazine)

Cavalier

Cavalier (ər) was the name used by Parliamentarians for a supporter of King Charles I and his son Charles II during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). Cavaliers were also known as Royalists. Prince Rupert, commander of much of Charles I`s cavalry, is often considered an archetypical Cavalier. Cavalier....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavalier
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