town

Many towns grew up near to forts, which could be seen from their names. If a place name included the words chester or cester, it was because it was on the site of a Roman fort, for example, Chester, Gloucester, and Manchester. The word chester came from castrum, the Roman word for a fort. Most towns would also have shops and a market place called a…...

Town

[Vietnam] In Vietnam, there are two kinds of diministrative subdivisions that can be translate into town or township: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Town_(Vietnam)

town

[n] - an urban area with a fixed boundary that is smaller than a city 2. [n] - the people living in a municipality smaller than a city
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=town

Town

Town noun [ Middle English toun , tun , Anglo-Saxon tun inclosure, fence, village, town; akin to Dutch tuin a garden, German zaun a hadge, fence, Old High German zun , Icelandic tun an inclosure, homestead, house, Ir. & Gael. dun a fortress, W....
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/77

town

1. Formerly: An inclosure which surrounded the mere homestead or dwelling of the lord of the manor. The whole of the land which constituted the domain. A collection of houses inclosed by fences or walls. ... 2. Any number or collection of houses to which belongs a regular market, and which is not a city or the see of a bishop. ... 3. Any collection...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

town

townspeople noun the people living in a municipality smaller than a city; `the whole town cheered the team`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Town

• (adv. & prep.) A township; the whole territory within certain limits, less than those of a country. • (adv. & prep.) A farm or farmstead; also, a court or farmyard. • (adv. & prep.) The metropolis or its inhabitants; as, in winter the gentleman lives in town; in summer, in the country. • (adv. & prep.) Formerly: (a) An inclosu...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/town/

town

(from the article `Europe, history of`) ...for the future: it was a seaport and capital, but with a solid base in manufacturing, trade, and finance. Like Naples, it was a magnet for the ... Wide, paved squares flanked the palaces, and around them spread extensive towns, which by this time if not earlier seem to have been unwalled. ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/67

town

town, in the United States. In the New England states the town is the basic unit of local government. The New England town government's unique feature is the town meeting, much praised as a nearly pure form of democracy. At the annual meeting of voters, town officers are elected and local issues suc...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0849172.html

Town

Town is Jamaican slang for Kingston.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZT.HTM

Town

Town was the name given to a village which was surrounded by a delimiting and protective hedge. The word town derives from the Anglo-Saxon word tun, meaning a hedge or enclosure.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AT.HTM

Town

[New England] AMI 958A Backplane with MG9073S ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Town_(New_England)

Town

[Newcastle-under-Lyme ward] Town ward is a ward in the Borough of Newcastle-under-Lyme. It covers the town centre of Newcastle-under-Lyme. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Town_(Newcastle-under-Lyme_ward)

Town

[New Jersey] A Town in the context of New Jersey local government refers to one of five types and one of eleven forms of municipal government. While Town is often used as a shorthand to refer to a Township, the two are not the same. The Town Act of 1895 allowed any municipality or area with a population exceeding 5,000 to become a Town thro...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Town_(New_Jersey)

Town

To race in
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_Australian_and_New_Zealand_punting

Town

To race in ‘town’ means to race on metropolitan tracks in a capital city, as distinct from all other tracks which are collectively called ‘The Bush’.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary152.htm
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