Topology

Shape and folding motif of protein chain in 3D space.

topology

geometric arrangement of nodes and cable links in a local area network; may be either centralized and decentralized.

Topology

Topology (from the Greek τόπος, `place`, and λόγος, `study`) is the mathematical study of shapes and topological spaces. It is an area of mathematics concerned with the properties of space that are preserved under continuous deformations including stretching and bending, but not tearing or gluing. This includes such properties as con...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topology

Topology

• (n.) The art of, or method for, assisting the memory by associating the thing or subject to be remembered with some place.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/topology/

Topology

(from the article `Aleksandrov, Pavel Sergeevich`) ...through the use of simplexes, a higher-dimensional analogy of points, lines, and triangles. He wrote about 300 mathematical books and papers in ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/62

Topology

(NETWORK GLOSSARY) The physical arrangement of network nodes and media within an enterprise networking structure.
Found on http://www.instrument-net.co.uk/newworkglossary.html

Topology

1. The arrangement of computing devices in a network. 2. A term describing such an arrangement.
Found on http://www.wildpackets.com/resources/compendium/glossary_of_networking_term

topology

noun the configuration of a communication network
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

topology

analysis situs noun the branch of pure mathematics that deals only with the properties of a figure X that hold for every figure into which X can be transformed with a one-to-one correspondence that is continuous in both directions
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

topology

(computing) In computing, the arrangement of devices in a network. The most common is the bus topology, where all the computers are interconnected using a single, open-ended cable. Most modern network solutions use either a ring or bus layout, but with physical characteristics that resembl...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0035679.html

topology

(maths) Click images to enlargeBranch of geometry that deals with those properties of a figure that remain unchanged even when the figure is transformed (bent, stretched) – for example, when a square painted on a rubber sheet is deformed b...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005344.html

Topology

[chemistry] In chemistry, topology provides a convenient way of describing and predicting the molecular structure within the constraints of three-dimensional (3-D) space. Given the determinants of chemical bonding and the chemical properties of the atoms, topology provides a model for explaining how the atoms ethereal wave functions must fi...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topology_(chemistry)

Topology

[electrical circuits] The topology of an electronic circuit is the form taken by the network of interconnections of the circuit components. Different specific values or ratings of the components are regarded as being the same topology. Topology is not concerned with the physical layout of components in a circuit, nor with their positions on...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topology_(electrical_circuits)

Topology

[musical ensemble] Topology is a post-modernist quintet from Australia, formed in 1997. A leading Australian new music ensemble, they perform throughout Australia and abroad and have to date released four albums, including one with rock/electronica band Full Fathom Five and one with contemporary ensemble Loops. They were formerly the reside...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Topology_(musical_ensemble)

Topology

To·pol'o·gy noun [ Greek ... place + - logy .] The art of, or method for, assisting the memory by associating the thing or subject to be remembered with some place. [ R.]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/71

topology

branch of mathematics, sometimes referred to as `rubber sheet geometry,` in which two objects are considered equivalent if they can be continuously ... [13 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/62

Topology

In networking, this refers to the physical or logical arrangement of a network. Physical Topology wo
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Computers/

topology

Is defined with respect to a set X. A 'topology in X' is a set of subsets of X satisfying several criteria. Let t denote a topology in X. The sets in t are by definition 'open sets' with respect to t, and sets outside of t are not. t satisfies the following: (1) X and the null set are in t. (2) Finite or infinite unions of open sets (that is, eleme...
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=topology

Topology

Properties of geometric forms that remain invariant when the forms are deformed or transformed by bending, stretching or shrinking. Among the topological properties of concern in GIS are connectivity, order and neighbourhood.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20195

topology

study of places and their natural features
Found on http://phrontistery.info/t.html

Topology

Term used to describe the layout or structure of a network. Examples include Star and Ring.
Found on http://www.ft.com/dbglossary

Topology

The classification of circuit configurations of power converters into clearly identifiable and characteristic types, usually based on the way the power circuit switching semiconductors and magnetic components are connected. Examples of circuit topologies are Flyback, Push-Pull, Half-Bridge etc
Found on http://www.albacom.co.uk/Web/Site/defence/def_pow_glossary.html

Topology

The description of the physical layout of a computer network.
Found on http://www.isomatic.co.uk/WBGlossary.htm

Topology

The shape of the physical connection of a network with regard to repeaters and networked computers. The three main types are ring, bus, and star.
Found on http://www.comptechdoc.org/independent/networking/cert/netterms.html

topology

The study of those properties of mathematical objects that remain unaffected by smooth deformations, such as stretching and squeezing, but that don't involve tearing. The word comes from the Greek topos for 'place,' and was introduced into English by Solomon Lefschetz in the late 1920s. A topologist...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/T/topology.html
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