Sarabande

(from the article `Literature`) ...of a biologist who returns to France for the first time in 25 years and finds hopelessness, boredom, and socialism crushing the spirit of his ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/30

sarabande

originally, a dance considered disreputable in 16th-century Spain, and, later, a slow, stately dance that was popular in France. Possibly of Mexican ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/30

Sarabande

One of the most ancient court dances of the 16th century. It was a stately affair during which couples paraded forwarded for four steps and then back of four steps in an endless variety of patterns according to the number of couples taking part.
Found on http://www.centralhome.com/dance-positions.htm

Sarabande

The sarabande (from French sarabande, itself derived from Spanish zarabanda) is a dance in triple metre. ==History== The sarabande is first mentioned in Central America: in 1539, a dance called zarabanda is mentioned in the poem Vida y tiempo de Maricastaña written in Panama by Fernando de Guzmán Mejía. The dance seems to have been especially p...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarabande

sarabande

a dignified dance, probably originally from Spain. In 3/4 or 3/2 time, usually starting on the first beat. It moves along at a steady pace, with an accent or a prolonged note on the second beat. It is in AB form, with the phrases ending on the second beat. Commonly found in the old suites.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22288

Sarabande

Stately Spanish Baroque dance type in triple meter, a standard movement of the Baroque suite.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

sarabande

stately Spanish Baroque court dance
Found on http://phrontistery.info/s.html
No exact match found