magnitude

  1. the property of relative size or extent
  2. relative importance

magnitude

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Beam calculations) The size of something, regardless of its direction or whether it is positive or negative.

Magnitude

(1) The quantifiable size of a natural event. (2) A quantitative measure of the size of an earthquake using the Richter scale.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/m.html

magnitude

(from the article `mathematics`) ...significant conceptually, he set aside Viète`s principle of homogeneity, showing by means of a simple construction how to represent multiplication ... A vector is a quantity that has both magnitude and direction. It is typically represented symbolically by an arrow in the proper direction, whos...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/11

magnitude

[n] - relative importance 2. [n] - the property of relative size or extent
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=magnitude

Magnitude

• (n.) Anything of which greater or less can be predicated, as time, weight, force, and the like. • (n.) Extent of dimensions; size; -- applied to things that have length, breath, and thickness. • (n.) Greatness, in reference to influence or effect; importance; as, an affair of magnitude. • (n.) Greatness; grandeur. • (n.) ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/magnitude/

magnitude

noun the property of relative size or extent (whether large or small); `they tried to predict the magnitude of the explosion`; `about the magnitude of a small pea`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

magnitude

(astronomy) In astronomy, measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial object. The larger the number denoting the magnitude, the fainter the object. Zero or first magnitude indicates some of the brightest stars. Still brighter are those of negative magnitude, such as Sirius, whose ma...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0010339.html

Magnitude

[astronomy] Magnitude is the logarithmic measure of the brightness of an object, in astronomy, measured in a specific wavelength or passband, usually in optical or near-infrared wavelengths. The sun has an apparent magnitude of −27, a full moon −13 and the brightest planet Venus measures −5. The brightest man-made objects, Iridium fla...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnitude_(astronomy)

Magnitude

[mathematics] In mathematics, magnitude is the size of a mathematical object, a property by which the object can be compared as larger or smaller than other objects of the same kind. More formally, an object`s magnitude is an ordering (or ranking) of the class of objects to which it belongs. ==History== The Greeks distinguished between seve...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnitude_(mathematics)

magnitude

[Noun] Great size or importance.
Example: She was not put off by the magnitude of the problem.
Found on http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/glossary/

Magnitude

Mag'ni·tude noun [ Latin magnitudo , from magnus great. See Master , and confer Maxim .] 1. Extent of dimensions; size; -- applied to things that have length, breadth, and thickness. « Conceive those particles of bodies to be so disposed amongst themselves, t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/7

magnitude

1. Extent of dimensions; size; applied to things that have length, breath, and thickness. 'Conceive those particles of bodies to be so disposed amongst themselves, that the intervals of empty spaces between them may be equal in magnitude to them all.' (Sir I. Newton) ... 2. <geometry> That which has one or more of the three dimensions, length...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Magnitude

A measure of earthquake size, determined by taking the common logarithm base 10) of the largest grou
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22392

magnitude

A measure of earthquake size, determined by taking the common logarithm (base 10) of the largest ground motion observed during the arrival of a P-wave or seismic surface wave and applying a standard correction for distance to the epicenter.
Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

magnitude

A measure of the strength of an earthquake based on the amount of movement recorded by a seismograph . compare Richter scale.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22327

Magnitude

A measure of the strength of an earthquake. There are several scales depending on which part of the seismogram is examined. These include Richter local magnitude (ML), Body wave magnitude (mb) and surface wave magnitude (Ms). Moment magnitude (Mw) is calculated from spectral analysis.
Found on http://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/glossary.html

Magnitude

A number denoting the brightness of a star or other celestial object. The higher the magnitude, the fainter the object. For example, a 1st-magnitude star is 100 times brighter than a 6th-magnitude star.
Found on http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-terms/

Magnitude

A numerical expression of the amount of energy released by an earthquake, determined by measuring earthquake waves on standardized recording instruments (seismographs.) The number scale for magnitude is a modified logarithmic value, rather than arithmetic, and the numbers get real big, real fast; a magnitude 9 earthquake, for example, is 33 times g...
Found on http://jersey.uoregon.edu/~mstrick/geology/geo_glossary_page.html

Magnitude

A numerical expression of the amount of energy released by an earthquake, determined by measuring earthquake waves on standardized recording instruments (seismographs.) The number scale for magnitudes is logarithmic rather than arithmetic. Therefore, deflections on a seismograph for a magnitude 5 earthquake, for example, are 10 times greater than t...
Found on http://volcano.oregonstate.edu/glossary/1

Magnitude

A numerical expression of the amount of energy released by an earthquake, determined by measuring earthquake waves on standardized recording instruments (seismographs.) The number scale for magnitudes is logarithmic rather than arithmetic. Therefore, deflections on a seismograph for a magnitude 5 earthquake, for example, are 10 times greater than t...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21455

Magnitude

A quantity characteristic of the total energy released by an earthquake, as contrasted with intensity, which describes its effects at a particular place. A number of earthquake magnitude scales exist, including local (or Richter) magnitude (ML), body wave magnitude (Mb), surface wave magnitude (Ms), moment magnitude (Mw), and coda magnitude (Mc). A...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20129

Magnitude

A way of expressing the brightness of astronomical objects inherited from the Greeks. In the magnitude system, a lower number indicates a brighter object (for example, a 1st magnitude star is brighter than a 3rd magnitude star). Each step in magnitude corresponds to a brightnesss difference of a factor of about 2.5. Stars of the 6th magnitude are t...
Found on http://www.astrosociety.org/education/publications/tnl/14/14.html

Magnitude

How bright a celestial body is.
Found on http://www.solarspace.co.uk/Glossary3.php

magnitude

in astronomy, measure of the brightness of a star or other celestial body. The brighter the object, the lower the number assigned as a magnitude. In ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/11
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