Hearsay

Hearsay evidence is `an out-of-court statement introduced to prove the truth of the matter asserted therein.` In court hearsay evidence is inadmissible (the `Hearsay Evidence Rule`) unless an exception to the Hearsay Rule applies. For example, to prove Tom was in town, the attorney asks a witness, `What did Susan tell you about Tom being in t...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hearsay

hearsay

something one has heard, but does not know to be true.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/o/the-oedipus-trilogy/study-help/ful

hearsay

the principle that hearsay (secondhand reporting of events as opposed to what one has personally witnessed) was not admissable in court was beginning to emerge during the early modern period, although it was not strictly observed until well into the eighteenth century
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21814

Hearsay

• (n.) Report; rumor; fame; common talk; something heard from another.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hearsay/

Hearsay

(n) Hearsay is the evidence or witness provided by a person in a legal proceedings based on the information he collected from others, gathered of his own without knowing it personally or without being an eye witness.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

hearsay

adjective heard through another rather than directly; `hearsay information`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Hearsay

Hear'say` (hēr'sā`) noun Report; rumor; fame; common talk; something heard from another. « Much of the obloquy that has so long rested on the memory of our great national poet originated in frivolous hearsays of his life and conversation.» Prof. Wilson. Hear...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/23

hearsay

a type of testimony given by a witness who relates not what he/she knows personally, but what others have told the witness, or what the witness has heard said by others; may be admissible or inadmissible in court depending upon rules of evidence
Found on https://www.nycourts.gov/lawlibraries/glossary.shtml

hearsay

Evidence not known to a witness personally, but which was relayed to witness by a third party, i.e., secondhand information. Generally inadmissible in court, although exceptions exist under which it can be admitted.
Found on http://www.pacourts.us/learn/legal-glossary

hearsay

hearsay: see evidence.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0914244.html

hearsay

in Anglo-American law, testimony that consists of what the witness has heard others say. United States and English courts may refuse to admit ... [1 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/28

Hearsay

Secondhand information that a witness only heard about from someone else and did not see or hear himself. Hearsay is not admitted in court because it's not trustworthy, as well as because of various constitutional principles such as the right to confront one's accusers, however, there are so many exceptions that often times hearsay is admitted more...
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def/h007.htm

Hearsay

Testimony by a witness concerning events about which the witness has no personal knowledge. Hearsay testimony conveys not what the witness observed personally, but what others told the witness or what the witness heard others say. Hearsay is usually not admissible as evidence in court because of its unreliability.
Found on http://jec.unm.edu/manuals-resources/glossary-of-legal-terms

Hearsay

Testimony given by a witness who is not telling what he or she knows personally, but what others have said.
Found on http://www.nolo.com/dictionary/hearsay-term.html

hearsay

[adj] - heard through another rather than directly
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hearsay
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