Haiku

Miniature Japanese poem consisting of 17 syllables - five syllables in first line, seven in second and five in the last. No rhyme or meter scheme is employed when writing haiku. The aim of the haiku is to create something greater than the sum of the parts e.g.
Reflections
Today your surface
Is a mirror where the sky
Bends to see itself....
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

haiku

[n] - an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=haiku

haiku

17-syllable Japanese verse genre, usually divided into three lines of five, seven, and five syllables. Japanese poet Basho popularized the form in the 17th century. It evolved from the...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Haiku

Japanese form. The poem has three lines and 17 syllables in total in the pattern 5, 7, 5: Loving, faithful, fun Trusting and loyal and true Chocolate-brown Suki
Found on http://www.standards.dfes.gov.uk/primary/publications/literacy/63285/nls_fw

haiku

noun an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

haiku

unrhymed Japanese poetic form consisting of 17 syllables arranged in three lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables respectively. The term haiku is derived ... [13 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/4

haiku

Japanese poem of three unrhyming lines in 5, 7, and 5 syllables. For example, windshield wipers swish and Monday fm blues say melancholy grace (I.L.)
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

haiku

haiku (hī'kOO) , an unrhymed Japanese poem recording the essence of a moment keenly perceived, in which nature is linked to human nature. It usually consists of 17 jion (Japanese symbol-sounds). The term is also used for foreign adaptations of the haiku, notably the poems of the imagists. ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0822364.html

haiku

17-syllable Japanese verse genre, usually divided into three lines of five, seven, and five syllables. Japanese poet Basho popularized the form in the 17th century. It evolved from the 31-syllable tanka form dominant from the 8th century
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0004156.html

Haiku

[operating system] Haiku is a free and open-source operating system compatible with the now discontinued BeOS. Its development began in 2001, and the operating system became self-hosting in 2008. The first alpha release was made in September 2009, and the most recent was November 2012. Haiku is supported by Haiku, Inc., a non-profit organiz...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku_(operating_system)

Haiku

In Japanese, haiku are traditionally printed in a single vertical line while haiku in English often appear in three lines to parallel the three phrases of Japanese haiku. Previously called hokku, haiku was given its current name by the Japanese writer Masaoka Shiki at the end of the 19th century. ==Syllables or on in haiku== In comparison with Eng...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haiku

haiku

an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552

Haiku

A three line, seventeen syllable poem, usually about nature.
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary1.html

Haiku

(pluralhaiku, from archaic Japanese)
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Haiku

Japanese poem of three unrhyming lines in 5, 7, and 5 syllables. For example, windshield wipers swis
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

haiku

an epigrammatic Japanese verse form of three short lines
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552
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