equites

The order of knights, second in the social scale beneath the senators, descended from the first Republican cavalry officers. In early Roman history, the equestrian class formed the cavalry. However, following the lex Claudia laws of 218 BC, which prevented senators from engaging in commerce, the equestrians stepped into a more commercial role, and …...

Equites

The Equites (aka ordo equester, sometimes called `knights` in modern times because of the involvement of horses) constituted the lower of the two aristocratic classes of ancient Rome, ranking below the patricians (patricii), a hereditary caste that monopolized political power during the regal era (to 509 BC) and during the early Republic (to 338.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equites

Equites

• (n. pl) An order of knights holding a middle place between the senate and the commonalty; members of the Roman equestrian order.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/equites/

Equites

Eq'ui·tes noun pl [ Latin , plural of eques a horseman.] (Rom. Antiq.) An order of knights holding a middle place between the senate and the commonalty; members of the Roman equestrian order.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/E/61

equites

equites (ek'witēz) [Lat.,=horsemen], the original cavalry of the Roman army, chosen, according to legend, by Romulus from the three ancient Roman tribes; the equites were selected from the senatorial class on the basis of wealth. During the late republic they numbered 1,800, but during the...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0817540.html

equites

Latin form for Equestrian order, originally the cavalry of the ancient Roman army, and later an elite Roman business class. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Equites

The Equites or 'horse-soldiers' were the richest class of citizens in ancient Rome, who by constitution of Servius Tullius had to serve in the cavalry.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXEA.HTM
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