Ductility

[Earth science] In Earth science, ductility refers to the tendency of rock to deform to large strains without macroscopic fracturing. Such behaviour may occur in unlithified or poorly lithified sediments, in weak materials such as halite or at greater depths in all rock types where higher temperatures promote crystal plasticity and higher c...
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ductility

the ability of a material to develop significant, permanent deformation before it breaks. See plastic deformation.
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Ductility

a measure of a material's ability to undergo appreciable plastic deformation before fracture.
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ductility

[n] - the malleability of something that can be drawing into wires or hammered into thin sheets
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Ductility

The ability of a material to develop significant, permanent deformation before it breaks. See plastic deformation.
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Ductility

Extent to which a material can sustain plastic deformation without rupture. Elongation and Reduction of Area are common indices of ductility.
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Ductility

A measure of a material's ability to undergo appreciable plastic deformation before fracture; it may be expressed as percent elongation or percent area reduction from a tensile test.
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ductility

a measure of a materials ability to undergo appreciable plastic deformation before fracture.
Found on http://www.chemicalglossary.net/definition/547-Ductility

Ductility

Duc·til'i·ty noun [ Confer French ductilité .] 1. The property of a metal which allows it to be drawn into wires or filaments. 2. Tractableness; pliableness. South.
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ductility

ductileness noun the malleability of something that can be drawn into threads or wires or hammered into thin sheets
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Ductility

• (n.) The property of a metal which allows it to be drawn into wires or filaments. • (n.) Tractableness; pliableness.
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ductility

(from the article `radiation`) 4. Hardness and ductility depend on perfection of the crystal structure. It is thus found that irradiation results in a loss of ductility and an ... ...Hot-rolling or hot-forging eliminate much of the porosity, directionality, and segregation that may be present in cast shapes. The resulting ... Ductili...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/79

ductility

ductility 1. Capability of being extended by beating, drawn out into wire, worked upon, or bent; malleability, pliableness, flexibility. 2. Capability of being easily led or influenced; tractableness, docility.
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Ductility

Is the ability of a material to withstand large inelastic deformations without fracture. Structural steel has considerable ductility.
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ductility

The ability of a material to deform plastically without fracturing, measured by elongation or reduction of area in a tensile test, by height of cupping in an Erichsen test, or by other means
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21115

Ductility

The property of a metal that lets you give it a great deal of mechanical deformation without cracking.
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ductility

ductility, ability of a metal to plastically deform without breaking or fracturing, with the cohesion between the molecules remaining sufficient to hold them together (see adhesion and cohesion). Ductility is important in wire drawing and sheet stamping. The metal must neither break nor be scraped o...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0816232.html

Ductility

Ductility is the property of solid bodies, particularly metals, which renders them capable of being extended by drawing, while their thickness or diameter is diminished, without any actual fraction or separation of their parts. On this property the wire-drawing of metals depends. The following is nearly the order of ductility of the metals which po...
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ductility

property of a metal in which it can be stretched without breaking.
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ductility

how much strain a material will take before it breaks.
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Ductility

elongation property of steel that resists fracturing during deformation
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ductility

Ability to undergo permanent changes of shape without rupturing.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22435

Ductility

In materials science, ductility is a solid material`s ability to deform under tensile stress; this is often characterized by the material`s ability to be stretched into a wire. Malleability, a similar property, is a material`s ability to deform under compressive stress; this is often characterized by the material`s ability to form a thin sheet...
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Ductility

The property of a metal that permits it to be drawn, rolled, or hammered without fracturing or break
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Ductility

A metal is said to be perfectly ductile when it is capable of being drawn out to great length.
Found on http://jot101.com/2015/05/a-z-of-science-fiction-words/
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