Dimeter

In poetry, a dimeter ər is a metrical line of verse with two feet. The particular foot, of course, can vary. Consider Thomas Hood`s `Bridge of Sighs:`, in which the lines are of two feet, each composed of three syllables: Also, the first line of William Wordsworth`s `We Are Seven`: ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimeter

Dimeter

• (n.) A verse of two meters. • (a.) Having two poetical measures or meters.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/dimeter/

dimeter

(from the article `prosody`) It has been noted that four feet make up a line of tetrameter verse; a line consisting of one foot is called monometer, of two dimeter, of three ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/50

Dimeter

Dim'e·ter adjective [ Latin dimeter , Greek ...; di- = di`s- twice + ... measure.] Having two poetical measures or meters. -- noun A verse of two meters.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/67

Dimeter

A line containing only two metrical feet. See meter and foot.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Dimeter

A line of poetry consisting of two metrical feet. Dimeters are comparatively rare but an example of an iambic dimeter is The Robin by Thomas Hardy. An example of a dactylic dimeter is The Charge of the Light Brigade by Tennyson.
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

Dimeter

Two feet
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

dimeter

two feet; sometimes termed dipody, a double foot, that is, one measure made up of two feet. An example is Alfred lord Tennyson's 'The Charge of the Light Brigade.'
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic
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