Crozier

• (n.) See Crosier.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/crozier/

Crozier

[crater] The narrow rim of this crater forms a distorted enclosure that has outward bulges along the northwest, southwest, and southeastern sides. The interior floor has been resurfaced and nearly filled by basaltic lava, producing a level surface with a low albedo that matches the dark hue of the nearby lunar mare. Nearly adjacent to the o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crozier_(crater)

Crozier

[mycology] A crozier is an anatomical feature of many fungi in the phylum Ascomycota that form at the base of asci and look like hook-topped shepherd’s staffs or stylized religious crosiers. The term is also used in describing the unfurled frond of certain fern species. During the ascus initial formation the crozier helps to maintain a di...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crozier_(mycology)

Crozier

Cro'zier noun See Crosier .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/194

crozier

A recurved hook at the tip of an ascogenous hypha, the penultimate cell of which will become the ascus.
Found on http://ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_C.htm

crozier

A staff carried by a bishop, archbishop, abbot or abbess. It is in the shape of a shepherd's crook, and has symbolic significance connected with the New Testament idea of Christ as shepherd of a flock. The crook and staff of the crozier may be heavily decorated.
Found on http://www.pitt.edu/~medart/menuglossary/INDEX.HTM

Crozier

The crozier or crosier is a bishop's staff of office. It generally resembles a shepherd's crook in shape, and may have developed from the hooked staff carried by the Roman augurs. The original form of the staff resembled a shepherd's crook, but from the middle of the 14th century the archbishops began to carry, sometimes in addition to the pastoral...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AC1.HTM
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