Creole

• (a.) Of or pertaining to a Creole or the Creoles. • (n.) One born of European parents in the American colonies of France or Spain or in the States which were once such colonies, esp. a person of French or Spanish descent, who is a native inhabitant of Louisiana, or one of the States adjoining, bordering on the Gulf of of Mexico.Creole: ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/creole/

creole

noun a mother tongue that originates from contact between two languages
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Creole

[markup] Creole is a lightweight markup language, aimed at being a common markup language for wikis, enabling and simplifying the transfer of content between different wiki engines. The idea was conceived during a workshop at the 2007 International Symposium on Wikis. An EBNF grammar and XML interchange format for Creole have also been publ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creole_(markup)

Creole

Cre'ole adjective Of or pertaining to a Creole or the Creoles. » In New Orleans the word Creole is applied to any product, or variety of manufacture, peculiar to Louisiana; as, Creole ponies, chickens, cows, shoes, eggs, wagons, baskets, etc.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/185

Creole

Cre'ole noun [ French cr...ole , Spanish criollo , from an American negro word, perhaps a corruption of a Spanish criadillo , dim. of criado servant, formerly also, child, from Latin creatus , past participle of creare to create. Confer Create .] One b...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/185

creole

A creole language is a new language created when children acquire their parents’ pidgin language as their first language, for example Hawaiian creole and Guyanese creole.
Found on http://www.viviancook.uk/Linguistics/LinguisticsGlossary.htm

Creole

A native language combining the traits of multiple languages, i.e., an advanced and fully developed
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

creole

A term used to describe a pidgin after it has become the mother tongue of a certain population. This development usually implies that the pidgin has become more complex grammatically and has increased its vocabulary in order to deal with the entire set of situations in which a native language is used. A well-known example is Tok Pisin, a creole spo...
Found on https://www.uni-due.de/ELE/LinguisticGlossary.html

creole

creole (crē'ōl) , Span. criollo (crēōl'yō) [probably from crío=child], term originally applied in West Indies to the native-born descendants of the Spanish conquerors. The term has since been applied to certain descendants in the West Indies and the Ameri...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/society/A0813988.html

Creole

Creole describes persons not of an aboriginal race born in the West Indies, parts of America, South America and other Spanish or French colonies. Creole does not imply mixed blood, but rather any person born in a place where his race is not indigenous.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/CXCA.HTM

Creole

Creole is American slang for a resident of Louisiana.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZCA.HTM

Creole

HMS Creole was a British C Class destroyer of 1710 tons displacement launched in 1945. HMS Creole was powered by two Admiralty 3-drum type boilers providing a top speed of 34 knots and carried a crew of 186. She was armed with four 4.5 inch dual-purpose guns; four 40 mm anti-aircraft guns; six 20 mm anti-aircraft guns; four 21-inch torpedo tubes.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/RCA.HTM

Creole

In cooking, the term Creole refers to a style of cooking from the southern states of the USA, particularly Louisiana, which originated from the mixed descendants of European, particularly French, and Black slaves. Creole cooking is characterised by the use of tomatoes, green peppers, onions and pepper mixed together blending French and Caribbean co...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/QC.HTM

Creole

In the West Indies and Spanish America, originally someone of European descent born in the New World; later someone of mixed European and African descent. In Louisiana and other states on the Gulf...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Creole

In the West Indies and Spanish America, originally someone of European descent born in the New World; later someone of mixed European and African descent. In Louisiana and other states on the Gulf of Mexico, it applies either to someone of French or Spanish descent or (popularly) to someone of mixed French or Spanish and African descent
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0017154.html

Creole

Initially meant locally born and was used to refer to the white colonial elite and locally born slaves. Today the term is used to describe the dialects and syncretic languages of the Caribbean and the syncretic nature of Caribbean culture.
Found on http://www.latinart.com/glossary.cfm?sort=C

Creole

originally, in the 16th–18th century, any white person born in Spanish America of Spanish parents, as distinguished from an American resident who had ... [15 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/157

creole

[adj] - of or relating to a language that arises from contact between two other languages and has features of both 2. [adj] - of or relating to or characteristic of native-born persons of French descent in Louisiana 3. [n] - a person of European descent born in the West Indies or Spanish America 4. [n] - a person descended from F...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=creole
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