Commensurable

• (a.) Having a common measure; capable of being exactly measured by the same number, quantity, or measure.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/commensurable/

commensurable

(from the article `celestial mechanics`) ...configurations occur when the mean motions of Jupiter and the small particle—here an asteroid—are near a ratio of small integers. The orbital mean ... ...the volumes of prisms and cylinders, respectively, with the same bases and heights. Various traces suggest that Eudoxus`s proof of...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/115

commensurable

adjective able to be measured by a common standard; `hours and minutes are commensurable`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Commensurable

Com·men'su·ra·ble adjective [ Latin commensurabilis ; prefix com- + mensurable . See Commensurate , and confer Commeasurable .] Having a common measure; capable of being exactly measured by the same number, quantity, or measure. -- Com*men'su*ra*ble*ness ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/116

Commensurable

Commensurable is an appellation given to such quantities or magnitudes as can be measured by one and the same common measure. Commensurable numbers are such as can be measured or divided by some other number without any remainder; such are 12 and 18, as being measured by 6 or 3.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GC.HTM

commensurable

Two lines or distances are commensurable if the ratio of their lengths is a rational number. If the ratio is an irrational number, they are called incommensurable.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/commensurable.html

commensurable

[adj] - able to be measured by a common standard
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=commensurable
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