Cittern

The cittern or cither (Fr. cistre, It. cetra, Ger. Cister, Sp. cistro, cedra, cítola) is a stringed instrument dating from the Renaissance. Modern scholars debate its exact history, but it is generally accepted that it is descended from the Medieval citole, or cytole. It looks much like the modern-day flat-back mandolin and the modern Irish bouzo...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cittern

Cittern

• (n.) An instrument shaped like a lute, but strung with wire and played with a quill or plectrum.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/cittern/

cittern

cithern noun a 16th century musical instrument resembling a guitar with a pear-shaped soundbox and wire strings
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Cittern

Cit'tern noun [ Latin cithara , Greek kiqa`ra . Confer Cithara , Gittern .] (Mus.) An instrument shaped like a lute, but strung with wire and played with a quill or plectrum. [ Written also cithern .] Shak. » Not to be confounded with zi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/84

cittern

cittern (sit'urn) , stringed musical instrument of the guitar family having an oval body, a flat back, and a fretted neck. Its strings, made of wire and varying in number, were plucked. It was first made in the Middle Ages and at that time was usually called citole or sitole. The name cittern wa...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0812329.html

cittern

plucked stringed musical instrument that was popular in the 16th–18th century. It had a shallow, pear-shaped body with an asymmetrical neck that was ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/c/88

Cittern

small flat backed wire-strung plucked instrument; played with a plectrum; popular from renaissance to baroque times. Modern citterns are much bigger, and more like mandolins in shape. Usually with 10 strings in 5 courses. Related to Portuguese Guitarra.
Found on http://www.hobgoblin-usa.com/info/glossary.htm

Cittern

The cittern or cithern was a musical instrument shaped like a lute, but strung with wire instead of gut and played with a quill or plectrum. Its eight strings were tuned to four notes, G, B, D, and E. It was frequently to be found in barbers' shops for the amusement of the waiting customers.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VC.HTM
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