chalk

  1. a soft whitish calcite
  2. a pure flat white with little reflectance

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Chalk

A soft type of limestone which when finely ground can be used to reduce soil acidity
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/visitor-contributions.php

Chalk

Chalk k is a soft, white, porous sedimentary rock, a form of limestone composed of the mineral calcite. Calcite is calcium carbonate or CaCO3. It forms under reasonably deep marine conditions from the gradual accumulation of minute calcite plates (coccoliths) shed from micro-organisms called coccolithophores. It is common to find chert or flint no...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalk

Chalk

• (n.) Finely prepared chalk, used as a drawing implement; also, by extension, a compound, as of clay and black lead, or the like, used in the same manner. See Crayon. • (v. t.) To manure with chalk, as land. • (n.) A soft, earthy substance, of a white, grayish, or yellowish white color, consisting of calcium carbonate, and having th...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/chalk/

chalk

(General) A dry, slightly abrasive substance that is applied to the cue tip to help assure a non-slip contact between the cue tip and the cue ball.
Found on http://www.billiardworld.com/glossary.html

chalk

noun a piece of calcite or a similar substance, usually in the shape of a crayon, that is used to write or draw on blackboards or other flat surfaces
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

chalk

(rock) Click images to enlargeSoft, fine-grained, whitish sedimentary rock composed of calcium carbonate, CaCO3, extensively quarried for use in cement, lime, and mortar, and in the manufacture of cosmetics and toothpaste. ...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0015227.html

Chalk

[military] In military terminology, a chalk is a group of paratroopers or other soldiers that deploy from a single aircraft. A chalk often corresponds to a platoon-sized unit for air assault operations, or a company-minus-sized organization for airborne operations. For air transport operations, it can consist of up to a company-plus-sized u...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalk_(military)

Chalk

Chalk noun [ Anglo-Saxon cealc lime, from Latin calx limestone. See Calz , and Cawk .] 1. (Min.) A soft, earthy substance, of a white, grayish, or yellowish white color, consisting of calcium carbonate, and having the same composition as common limestone. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/51

Chalk

Chalk transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Chalked ; present participle & verbal noun Chalking .] 1. To rub or mark with chalk. 2. To manure with chalk, as land. Morimer. 3. To make white, as wi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/C/51

Chalk

A fine grained, white calcium carbonate composed of coccoliths. Common in the Cretaceous of western Europe. The White Cliffs of Dover are a classic example of chalk cliffs.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20206

Chalk

A phosphate used by climbers to aid grip on rockfaces.
Found on http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/glossary

chalk

A soft compact calcite, CaCO3, with varying amounts of silica, quartz, feldspar, or other mineral impurities, generally gray-white or yellow-white and derived chiefly from fossil seashells.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/glossary_2.html

chalk

A soft compact calcite, CaCO3, with varying amounts of silica, quartz, feldspar, or other mineral impurities, generally gray-white or yellow-white and derived chiefly from fossil seashells.
Found on http://www.scientificpsychic.com/etc/geology-glossary.html

chalk

A soft compact calcite, CaCO3, with varying amounts of silica, quartz, feldspar, or other mineral impurities, generally gray-white or yellow-white and derived chiefly from fossil seashells.
Found on http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/glossary/gloss2geol.html

Chalk

A soft limestone formed mainly of coccolith skeletons.
Found on http://www.bgs.ac.uk/discoveringGeology/glossary.html

chalk

a term for calcium carbonate, used in brewing dark beers.
Found on https://byo.com/resources/glossary

Chalk

A variety of limestone composed of shells of microscopic oceanic organisms.
Found on http://www.evcforum.net/WebPages/Glossary_Geology.html

chalk

A variety of limestone made up in part of biochemically derived calcite, in form of skeletons or skeletal fragments of microscopic oceanic plants and animals mixed with fine-grained calcite deposits of biochemical or inorganic-chemical origin.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22327

chalk

A variety of limestone made up in part of biochemically derived calcite, in form of skeletons or skeletal fragments of microscopic oceanic plants and animals mixed with fine-grained calcite deposits of biochemical or inorganic-chemical origin.
Found on http://www.fossilmall.com/Science/Glossary.htm

Chalk

a variety of white limestone made from tiny mud-sized particles. The Chalk forms many of the low rounded hills in the south-east of England and was formed during the Cretaceous period
Found on http://www.sedgwickmuseum.org/education/glossary.html

Chalk

a white limestone almost entirely made of microscopic calcite platelets (coccoliths) produced by planktonic algae.
Found on https://www.geolsoc.org.uk/ks3/gsl/education/resources/rockcycle/page3451.h

Chalk

Calcium carbonate
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary071.htm

Chalk

Calcium carbonate. One of the whitest substances known. It has no use as a pigment with oil, although when mixed with an aqueous alue medium it makes an excellent ground for tempera or oil and retains its brilliant whiteness. It is the basis for most pastels and coloured chalks.
Found on http://www.visual-arts-cork.com/colour-art-glossary.htm

chalk

Chalk cliffs, Dorset, England A soft, porous form of limestone, composed mainly of calcium carbonate (CaCO3, see calcium) with varying amounts of silica, quartz, feldspar, or other impurities. Chalk is generally gray-white or yellow-white and is derived chiefly from the r...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/C/chalk.html
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