volatility

the tendency of a liquid to assume the gaseous state.

volatility

A measure of the amount of movement in the price of a stock.

Volatility

Ability of a substance to volatilise or assume a gaseous state.

Volatility

A measure of risk based on the standard deviation of investment fund performance over 3 years. Scale is 1-9; higher rating indicates higher risk. Also, the standard deviation of changes in the logarithm of an asset price, expressed as a yearly rate. Also, volatility is a variable that appears in option pricing formulas. In the option pricing formul...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20047

Volatility

Is the annualized standard deviation of the natural logarithms of asset returns.
Found on http://www.oasismanagement.com/glossary/

Volatility

Usually defined as the standard deviation of returns of an asset. Volatility generally refers to the magnitude of price movements in a specific asset. Large price movements are said to be more volatile and vice versa. Volatility has a major direct influence on option premium levels. When volatility is high, premiums increase (all other assumptions ...
Found on http://www.exchange-handbook.co.uk/index.cfm?section=glossary&first_letter=

Volatility

A statistical measure of the tendency of a market/share price to vary over time. Volatility is usually measured by the variance or standard deviation of the price and is said to be high if the price typically changes dramatically in a short period of time.
Found on http://www.henderson.com/sites/henderson/its/glossary.xhtml?letter=V

Volatility

Variability of the price of a security, market or asset class. The greater the extent of price movements the greater the volatility. It is used as a measure of investment risk as it aims to quantify the likelihood of an asset or portfolio falling in price just prior to liquidation.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20211

volatility

[n] - the property of changing readily from a solid or liquid to a vapor 2. [n] - the trait of being unpredictably irresolute
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=volatility

Volatility

Volatility relates to the movement in share prices. If the share has relatively large swings in price, or moves on a frequent basis it will be classed as a highy volatile share.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20416

Volatility

The measure of price change for a particular metal over a period of time. Volatility is measured historically in order to assess future or implied volatility.
Found on http://www.lme.co.uk/glossary.html

Volatility

A measure of a security's propensity to go up and down in price.A volatile share is one... <a target=_blank href='http://www.finance-glossary.com/terms/volatility.htm?id=1523&ginPtrCode=00000&PopupMode=false' title='Read full definition of volatility'>more</a>
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Volatility

A statistical measure of the risk of holding a security; the standard deviation of expected returns on a security....more on Volatility
Found on http://moneyterms.co.uk/s/

volatility

The variable amount by which a share price or market value rises and falls during a period of time. If it moves up and down rapidly or unpredictably, it has high volatility; if it is more stable or rarely changes, it has low volatility
Found on http://www.aviva.com/glossary/

Volatility

A measure of the amount of movement in the price of an instrument.
Found on http://www.londonstockexchange.com/global/glossary/v.htm

Volatility

• (n.) Quality or state of being volatile; disposition to evaporate; changeableness; fickleness.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/volatility/

volatility

(from the article `gasoline engine`) ...for lamps. As the gasoline engine developed, gasoline and the engine were harmonized to attain the best possible matching of characteristics. The ... ...are used for many trucks and buses and a few automobiles, and compressed liquefied hydrogen is being used experimentally. The most important ... ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/v/33

volatility

volatility 1. The property of changing readily from a solid or a liquid to a vapor. 2. The trait of being unpredictably irresolute: 'The volatility of the financial market drove many investors away.' 3. Being easily excited; excitability.
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2321/

Volatility

A measure of risk based on the standard deviation of the asset return. Volatility is a variable that appears in option pricing formulas, where it denotes the volatility of the underlying asset return from now to the expiration of the option. There are volatility indexes. Such as a scale of 1-9; a higher rating means higher risk.
Found on http://www.duke.edu/~charvey/Classes/wpg/bfglosv.htm

Volatility

A measurement of risk based on the standard deviation of the asset return. Volatility is also a variable in an options pricing formula. Discover What It`s Like to Live Easy With EquiTrend
Found on http://www.equitrend.com/glossary4248.xhtml

Volatility

The extent to which an economic variable, such as a price or an exchange rate, moves up and down over time.
Found on http://www-personal.umich.edu/~alandear/glossary/v.html

Volatility

[finance] In finance, volatility is a measure for variation of price of a financial instrument over time. Historic volatility is derived from time series of past market prices. An implied volatility is derived from the market price of a market traded derivative (in particular an option). The symbol σ is used for volatility, and corresponds...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volatility_(finance)

Volatility

The defining quality of a liquid that evaporates quickly when exposed to air.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21079

volatility

The tendency or ability of a liquid to pass into the vapour phase; liquids such as alcohol or gasoline, because of their tendency to evaporate rapidly, are called volatile liquids
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21114

volatility

The degree of price fluctuation for a given asset, rate, or index. Usually expressed as a variance or standard deviation. (See beta)
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21119
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