Triangulation

In trigonometry and geometry, triangulation is the process of determining the location of a point by measuring angles to it from known points at either end of a fixed baseline, rather than measuring distances to the point directly (trilateration). The point can then be fixed as the third point of a triangle with one known side and two known angles...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation

Triangulation

This term is used in a research context to describe the use of a variety of data sources or methods to examine a specific phenomenon either simultaneously or sequentially in order to produce a more accurate account of the phenomenon under investigation
Found on http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/information/glossary/

Triangulation

• (n.) The series or network of triangles into which the face of a country, or any portion of it, is divided in a trigonometrical survey; the operation of measuring the elements necessary to determine the triangles into which the country to be surveyed is supposed to be divided, and thus to fix the positions and distances of the several points...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/triangulation/

triangulation

(from the article `GPS`) The principle behind the unprecedented navigational capabilities of GPS is triangulation. To triangulate, a GPS receiver precisely measures the time ... ...the intersection of the two plotted lines gives the location of the aircraft or ship carrying the DF. This technique, using the directions to two ... [2 r...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/78

triangulation

noun a method of surveying; the area is divided into triangles and the length of one side and its angles with the other two are measured, then the lengths of the other sides can be calculated
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

triangulation

(engineering) Technique used in frame structures to provide strength and support. When a force is applied to a triangular frame, two of its members stretch the third one, making it tense. This in turn pulls the other two members towards it, making the structure rigid and spreading the force be...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0099081.html

triangulation

(surveying) Technique used in surveying to determine distances, using the properties of the triangle. To begin, surveyors measure a certain length exactly to provide a base line. From each end of this line they then measure the angle to a distant point, using a theodolite. They now have a tria...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0006284.html

Triangulation

[chess] Triangulation is a tactic used in chess to put one`s opponent in zugzwang. That is, it is a tactic, the goal of which is to return to the initial position in such a way that one`s opponent is then forced to move first in the position, when it is a disadvantage for that player to move, e.g. he must abandon a blockade and let the othe...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(chess)

Triangulation

[computer vision] For each triangulation method, it can be determined if this last relation is valid. If it is, it may be satisfied only for a subset of the projective transformations, for example, rigid or affine transformations. It turns out that xest lies exactly at the middle of the shortest line segment which joins the two projection l...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(computer_vision)

Triangulation

[geometry] In geometry, a triangulation of a planar object is a subdivision into triangles, and by extension the subdivision of higher-dimension geometric objects into simplices. Triangulation of a three-dimensional volume would involve subdividing it into tetrahedra (`pyramids` of various shapes and sizes) packed together. In most instance...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(geometry)

Triangulation

[politics] Triangulation is the name given to the act of a political candidate presenting his or her ideology as being `above` and `between` the `left` and `right` sides (or `wings`) of a traditional (e.g. UK or US) democratic `political spectrum`. It involves adopting for oneself some of the ideas of one`s political opponent (or apparent o...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(politics)

Triangulation

[psychology] The term triangulation is most commonly used to express a situation in which one family member will not communicate directly with another family member, but will communicate with a third family member, which can lead to the third family member becoming part of the triangle. The concept originated in the study of dysfunctional f...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(psychology)

Triangulation

[social science] In the social sciences, triangulation is often used to indicate that two (or more) methods are used in a study in order to check the results. `The concept of triangulation is borrowed from navigational and land surveying techniques that determine a single point in space with the convergence of measurements taken from two ot...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(social_science)

Triangulation

[topology] Triangulation is useful in determining the properties of a topological space. For example, one can compute homology and cohomology groups of a triangulated space using simplicial homology and cohomology theories instead of more complicated homology and cohomology theories. ==Piecewise linear structures== For topological manifolds...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation_(topology)

Triangulation

A method of determining the ancestral haplotype of an ancestor using the DNA results of direct line descendants.
Found on https://isogg.org/wiki/Genetics_Glossary

Triangulation

In general, the unique location of the source from some combination of at least three ranges and/or bearings in three dimensional space. See also: Tomography, Trilateration.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/t/r/triangulation/source.html

triangulation

in navigation, surveying, and civil engineering, a technique for precise determination of a ship`s or aircraft`s position, and the direction of ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/78

triangulation

Joining structural members together so that they form a rigid triangle
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21113

Triangulation

System of equating compass and maps to a known landmark.
Found on http://www.americantrails.org/

triangulation

The method of locating an epicenter by determining how far it lies from three widely separated seismographs.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22327

Triangulation

The process of pinning down a caller's location using three or more radio receivers, a compass and a
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Technology/Cell_Phones/

Triangulation

The use of a combination of research methods in a study. An example of triangulation would be a study that incorporated surveys, interviews, and observations. See also multi-modal methods
Found on http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/guide.cfm?guideid=84

Triangulation

The use of multiple research methods as a way of producing more reliable empirical data than is available from any single method.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20212

Triangulation

The use of three or more different research methods in combination to study the same phenomena, (eg observational studies, in-depth interviews and focus groups). Triangulation is used mainly as a check of validity.
Found on http://www.cirem.co.uk/definitions.html

Triangulation

the use of three or more fixed points, such as receiver buoys or satellites in orbit around the earth, to pinpoint the location of an object. This is the process by which the Global Positioning System (GPS) and tracking of some types of tagged animals work.
Found on http://www.coml.org/edu/glossary/g1.htm
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