tankard

Drinking vessel with handle for beer, ale or cider. The earliest surviving tankards from the 16th and 17th centuries retained the same basic form - straight, tapering sides with S-shaped handle, rectangular thumbpiece and a hinged lid - until lidded tankards went out of use in the 18thC. Open tankards or mugs were used from the 19thC.

tankard

[n] - large drinking vessel with one handle
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=tankard

Tankard

Tank'ard noun [ Old French tanquart ; confer OD. tanckaert ; of uncertain origin.] A large drinking vessel, especially one with a cover. « Marius was the first who drank out of a silver tankard , after the manner of Bacchus.» Arbuthnot.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/T/9

tankard

noun large drinking vessel with one handle
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Tankard

• (n.) A large drinking vessel, especially one with a cover.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/tankard/

tankard

drinking vessel for ale or beer, widely used in northern Europe (especially Scandinavia, Germany, and the British Isles) and in colonial America ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/t/11

Tankard

A mug with a hinged cover, usually for beer. More
Found on http://freespace.virgin.net/a.data/glossaryframes.htm

Tankard

a lidded drinking vessel. 15th-18th century.
Found on http://www.myfamilysilver.com/pages/glossary.aspx?glossaryType=95

Tankard

A tankard is a large, one-handled drinking vessel.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AT.HTM

Tankard

A tankard is a form of drinkware consisting of a large, roughly cylindrical, drinking cup with a single handle. Tankards are usually made of silver, pewter, or glass, but can be made of other materials, for example wood, ceramic or leather. A tankard may have a hinged lid, and tankards featuring glass bottoms are also fairly common. Tankards are s...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tankard
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