Hyperbole

exaggeration for emphasis or for rhetorical effect.
*My vegetable love should grow Vaster than empires, and more slow; An hundred years should got to praise Thine eyes and on thine forehead gaze; Two hundred to adore each breast, But thirty thousand to the rest. Andrew Marvell, 'To His Coy Mistress'
*Da mi basia mille, deinde centum, Dein mil...
Found on http://www.uky.edu/AS/Classics/rhetoric.html

Hyperbole

Exaggeration for dramatic effect e.g. Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe:
'Was this the face that launch'd a thousand ships,
And burnt the topless towers of Ilium?'
Found on http://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/glossary_of_poetic_terms.htm

hyperbole

[n] - extravagant exaggeration
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hyperbole

Hyperbole

Hy·per'bo·le noun [ Latin , from Gr..., prop., an overshooting, excess, from Greek ... to throw over or beyond; 'ype`r over + ... to throw. See Hyper- , Parable , and confer Hyperbola .] (Rhet.) A figure of speech in which the expression is an evident exaggerati...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/81

hyperbole

noun extravagant exaggeration
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Hyperbole

• (n.) A figure of speech in which the expression is an evident exaggeration of the meaning intended to be conveyed, or by which things are represented as much greater or less, better or worse, than they really are; a statement exaggerated fancifully, through excitement, or for effect.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hyperbole/

hyperbole

a figure of speech that is an intentional exaggeration for emphasis or comic effect. Hyperbole is common in love poetry, in which it is used to ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/90

hyperbole

hyperbole (high' pur AK tiv) 1. Exaggeration for effect; overstatement. 2. Not to be taken literally; a figure of speech, or a distortion of what is real. Examples: Thanks a million; Stubborn as a mule; Strong as an ox; Big as a whale. Related 'above, over, beyond the normal, ...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/1018/2

hyperbole

exaggeration beyond reasonable credence. An example is the close of John Donne's holy sonnet 'Death, thou shalt die!'
Found on http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display_rpo/terminology.cfm#acatalectic

hyperbole

An idea is expressed in an exaggerated way, usually to create humour or to emphasise the idea. The reader will immediately feel that the writer´s words are not to be taken literally.
Found on http://www.menrath-online.de/glossaryengl.html

hyperbole

hyperbole (hīpûr'bulē) , a figure of speech in which exceptional exaggeration is deliberately used for emphasis rather than deception. Andrew Marvell employed hyperbole throughout To His Coy Mistress:An hundred years should go to praise Thine eyes and on thy forehead gaze; Two h...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/ent/A0824757.html

Hyperbole

(Gr. hyperbole, over-shooting, excess) In rhetoric, that figure of speech according to which expressions gain their effect through exaggeration. The representation of things as greater or less than they really are, not intended to be accepted literally. Aristotle relates, for example, that when the winner of a mule-race paid enough money to a poet....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/h.html

Hyperbole

A hyperbole is a rhetorical figure, in which an idea is expressed with a fanciful exaggeration of phrase which is not to be taken too literally, but only as representing a certain warmth of admiration or emphasis. 'His fame reaches to the stars' is an example of hyperbole.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AH.HTM

hyperbole

Figure of speech that is an intentional exaggeration or overstatement, used for emphasis or comic effect. Many everyday idioms are hyperbolic: `waiting for ages` and `a flood of tears`
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0005961.html

Hyperbole

A figure of speech where emphasis is achieved through exaggeration, independently or through comparison
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary083.htm

Hyperbole

Hyperbole (iː {respell|hy|PUR|bə-lee}; Greek: ὑπερβολή hyperbolē, `exaggeration`) is the use of exaggeration as a rhetorical device or figure of speech. It may be used to evoke strong feelings or to create a strong impression, but is not meant to be taken literally. Hyperboles are exaggerations to create emphasis or effect. As a lite.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbole

hyperbole

extravagant exaggeration
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/134886

Hyperbole

Deliberate exaggeration. Short form is hype
Found on http://www.word-mart.com/html/glossary1.html

Hyperbole

The trope of exaggeration or overstatement. See tropes for examples.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22385

Hyperbole

Exaggeration beyond reasonable credence. An example is the close of john donne's holy sonnet 'death,
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22429

hyperbole

impression by extravagant exaggeration
Found on http://phrontistery.info/h.html

hyperbole

extravagant exaggeration
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/388670

hyperbole

an exaggeration or overstatement.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/a/american-poets-of-the-20th-century

hyperbole

extravagant exaggeration
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/479437

hyperbole

extravagant exaggeration
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/418206
No exact match found