trajectory

(Learning Modules / Mathematics / Modelling projectiles) Path through space.

Trajectory

===Orbiting objects=== If instead of a uniform downwards gravitational force we consider two bodies orbiting with the mutual gravitation between them, we obtain Kepler`s laws of planetary motion. The derivation of these was one of the major works of Isaac Newton and provided much of the motivation for the development of differential calculus. ==C....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trajectory

Trajectory

• (n.) The curve which a body describes in space, as a planet or comet in its orbit, or stone thrown upward obliquely in the air.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/trajectory/

trajectory

flight noun the path followed by an object moving through space
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Trajectory

[fluid mechanics] One problem with this formulation is the polar singularity: notice how the denominator in the first equation goes to zero when the latitude is 90 degrees—plus or minus. One means of overcoming this is to use a locally Cartesian coordinate system close to the poles. Another is to perform the integration on a pair of Azimu...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trajectory_(fluid_mechanics)

trajectory

In general, the path traced by any body, such as an arrow or a rocket, moving as a result of externally applied forces.
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/T/trajectory.html

trajectory

representation of the solution x(t) of the state equations as connecting line of the ends of the vector x(t) in state space with time as parameter
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=351-21-09

trajectory

series of states in a dynamical system {N0, N1, N2, ...}. For a deterministic generator function F() such that Nt+1 = F(Nt), then N1=F(N0), N2=F(F(N0
Found on http://www.econterms.com/glossary.cgi?query=trajectory

Trajectory

The arc described by a projectile (or a load of shot) after it exits the muzzle of a firearm. Falling objects accelerate downwards at a rate of 32 feet per second, per second. The faster a projectile travels, the greater the distance it can cover in a given time before dropping too far. Hence, the higher the velocity of a bullet, the flatter the tr...
Found on http://www.hallowellco.com/abbrevia.htm

Trajectory

The curve that a body, such as a celestial object, describes in space. This applies to air parcel mo
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Weather/

Trajectory

The flight path of a projectile, missile, rocket or satellite.
Found on http://www.braeunig.us/space/glossary.htm

trajectory

The flight path of the ball.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21422

Trajectory

The line of motion of the meteor relative to the Earth, considered in three dimensions.
Found on http://www.imo.net/glossary

trajectory

the path followed by an object moving through space
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/266466

trajectory

the path followed by an object moving through space
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552

trajectory

the path followed by an object moving through space
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/158769

trajectory

the path followed by an object moving through space
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/675552

trajectory

the path followed by an object moving through space
Found on https://www.vocabulary.com/lists/2404706

Trajectory

Trajectory = positions + velocities.
Found on http://www.drugdesign.com/web/teaching/glossary

trajectory

[n] - the path followed by an object moving through space
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=trajectory
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