stocks

Generally used as another word for equities.  Technically, this more accurately refers to fixed interest securities.

Stocks

Stocks are devices used internationally, in medieval, Renaissance and colonial American times as a form of physical punishment involving public humiliation. The stocks partially immobilized its victims and they were often exposed in a public place such as the site of a market to the scorn of those who passed by. ==Form and application== The stocks...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stocks

stocks

noun a former instrument of punishment consisting of a heavy timber frame with holes in which the feet (and sometimes the hands) of an offender could be locked
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Stocks

[shipyard] Stocks are an external framework in a shipyard used to support construction of (usually) wooden ships. They are normally associated with a slipway to allow the ship to slide down into the water. In addition to supporting the ship itself, they are typically used to give access to the ship`s bottom and sides. ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stocks_(shipyard)

Stocks

A machine commonly made of wood, with holes in it, in which to confine persons accused of or guilty of a crime. It was used either to confine unruly offenders by way of security, or convicted criminals for punishment. This barbarous punishment has been generally abandoned in the United States.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/s181.htm

Stocks

A wooden device previously used in oil tannages especially for chamois. Two wooden hammers pound the oil into the leather prior to hanging in a hot room for the oil to oxidise. The hammers are driven by an eccentric wheel. This process is now done in drums where temperature and humidity can be carefully controlled.
Found on http://redwood.uk.com/glossary

Stocks

Commercial grain stocks include domestic grain in storage in public and private elevators at importa
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22399

Stocks

Hand or machine-made bricks made in a mould
Found on http://www.fmb.org.uk/find-a-builder/helpful-advice/jargon-buster/?locale=e

Stocks

Hand or machine-made bricks made in a mould.
Found on http://www.interbuilders.co.uk/glossary/s/stocks.html

Stocks

In Britain, it refers to government debt securities, such as a gilt-edged investment, where a reasonable level of interest can be earned on a very low risk investment. In America, a stock is more likely to be a share.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20546

Stocks

Raw materials, work in progress and unsold consumer goods.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20140

Stocks

See Securities
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20606

Stocks

Stocks are small wooden structures which were used to punish people for small crimes. They have a wooden bench and a set of wooden planks with holes in, which were used to hold people's legs or arms. They were usually set up in public places, and the criminal would often have rotten fruit or vegetable thrown at them. Their use was abolished in 1837...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20766

Stocks

Stocks are two boards with semi-circular holes, set one above the other within two posts, and padlocked so as to confine the legs of a seated person just above the feet. Formerly every parish had stocks fixed in some public spot in which petty offenders were confined as punishment.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AS.HTM

Stocks

The combined value of raw materials, work in progress or under construction and finished goods held.
Found on http://www.digitallook.com/dlmedia/help/1004/glossary.html

stocks

The part of a fish population which is under consideration from the point of view of actual or potential utilization.
Found on http://www.pbs.org/emptyoceans/glossary.html

stocks

Wooden frame with holes used in Europe and the USA until the 19th century to confine the legs and sometimes the arms of minor offenders, and expose them to public humiliation. The pillory had a...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688
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