Shu

'The benevolent exercise of the principle of human nature in relation to others;' 'the extension of the principle of the self to other people and things;' 'the application of the principle of true manhood (jen);' 'the application of the principle of the central self (chung);' 'putting oneself in the position of others;' 'measuring others by onesel....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/s.html

Shu

(a) Statecraft, craft, tact, or method for a ruler to keep the ministers and the people under control, 'to award offices according to their responsibilities, to hold actualities in accordance with their names, to exercise the power of life and death, and to make use of the ability of the ministers.' See fa chia. (Legalists). (b) Magic. See shu and....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/s.html

shu

(from the article `Han Fei`) To ensure an effective bureaucracy and to protect his authority from encroachment or usurpation, the ruler must make use of shu (`administrative ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/88

Shu

[Egyptian deity] ==Family== He was created by Atum, his father and Iusaaset, his mother in the city of Heliopolis. With his sister Tefnut (moisture), he was the father of Nut and Geb. His daughter, Nut, was the sky goddess whom he held over the Earth (Geb), separating the two. The Egyptians believed that if Shu didn`t hold his son and daugh...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shu_(Egyptian_deity)

Shu

God, often identified with Heracles by the Greeks
Found on http://www.reshafim.org.il/ad/egypt/glossary.htm

Shu

In Egyptian mythology, god personifying the life-giving air. Created by Atum, a sun god of Heliopolis, Shu was the father of Geb, the earth, and Nut, the sky. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Shu

In Egyptian mythology, Shu was the god of air and son of Atum and the brother of Tefnut. He and Tefnut mated to produce the interlocking twins Geb and Nut, and Shu then separated them, leaving Geb floating in the primordial ocean and arching Nut's body high above as a pathway for the Sun to travel each day from horizon to horizon.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/D2.HTM

Shu

in Egyptian religion, god of the air and supporter of the sky, created by Atum by his own power, without the aid of a woman. Shu and his sister and ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/s/88

Shu

Number, which gives rise to form (hsiang) according to which things become. This philosophy was based on the I Ching (I. Book of Changes), developed in the medieval interpretation of it (chan wei), and culminated in Neo-Confucianism, especially in Shao K'ang-chieh (1011-1077). According to this philosophv, to Heaven belong the odd numbers which re....
Found on http://www.ditext.com/runes/s.html

shu

practice
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20455
No exact match found