scuttle

a kind of a bucket, usually with a wide lip, used for pouring.
Found on https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/w/wuthering-heights/study-help/full-

Scuttle

A small opening, or lid thereof, in a ship's deck or hull.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

Scuttle

• (v. t.) To sink by making holes through the bottom of; as, to scuttle a ship. • (v. i.) To run with affected precipitation; to hurry; to bustle; to scuddle. • (n.) A wide-mouthed vessel for holding coal: a coal hod. • (n.) A broad, shallow basket. • (v. t.) To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as ...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/scuttle/

scuttle

(1) A small opening or hatch with a movable lid in the deck or hull of a ship. (2) To sink by means of a hole in a ships hull.
Found on http://reservationsbvi.com/thisoldpirate/glossary.html

scuttle

coal scuttle noun container for coal; shaped to permit pouring the coal onto the fire
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Scuttle

[software] Scuttle is a PHP/MySQL-based open source social bookmarking application. It contains code from other PHP-based projects such as Drupal and jQuery. == Functions == Scuttle offers the same functionality as most of the social bookmarking websites such as tagging, RSS, multiple languages and security settings(public and private). It ...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scuttle_(software)

Scuttle

Scut'tle intransitive verb [ For scuddle , from scud .] To run with affected precipitation; to hurry; to bustle; to scuddle. « With the first dawn of day, old Janet was scuttling about the house to wake the baron.» Sir W. Scott.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/43

Scuttle

Scut'tle noun [ Anglo-Saxon scutel a dish, platter; confer Icelandic skutill ; both from Latin scutella , dim. of scutra , scuta , a dish or platter; confer scutum a shield. Confer Skillet .] 1. A broad, shallow basket. 2. A wide-mou...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/43

Scuttle

Scut'tle transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Scuttled ; present participle & verbal noun Scuttling .] 1. To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as of a ship), for any purpose. 2. To sink b...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/S/43

Scuttle

A framed opening in a roof used for access to the roof from inside a building.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

Scuttle

A hatch that provides access to the roof from the interior of the building.
Found on http://www.rbroof.com/glossary-of-terms

Scuttle

A round window in the side or deck of a boat that may be opened to admit light and air, and closed tightly when required.
Found on http://www.sailinglinks.com/glossary.htm

Scuttle

A small opening, or lid thereof, in a ship's deck or hull.
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_nautical_terms

Scuttle

A small opening, or lid thereof, in a ship's deck or hull. To cut a hole in, or sink something.
Found on http://www.translationdirectory.com/glossaries/glossary101.htm

Scuttle

Scuttle is political slang for an undignified withdrawal.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZS.HTM

Scuttle

Sink a ship
Found on https://www.piratevoyages.com/pirate-lingo/

scuttle

To deliberately sink a ship by making a hole in the hull.
Found on http://black-bart.co.uk/html/pirate_glossary.html

Scuttle

To make a hole in a ship
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22176

scuttle

[n] - container for coal
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=scuttle
No exact match found