Purveyance

Purveyance is the right of the Crown to requisition goods and services for royal use, and was developed in England over the course of the late eleventh through the fourteenth centuries. In theory, the king`s prerogative allowed him to collect goods needed for both household and military use, but the latter was discontinued in 1362. The primary pr....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purveyance

purveyance

[n] - the act of supplying something
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=purveyance

Purveyance

• (n.) That which is provided; provisions; food. • (n.) The act or process of providing or procuring; providence; foresight; preparation; management. • (n.) A providing necessaries for the sovereign by buying them at an appraised value in preference to all others, and oven without the owner`s consent. This was formerly a royal prerog...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/purveyance/

purveyance

noun the act of supplying something
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Purveyance

Pur¬∑vey'ance noun [ Confer French pourvoyance .] 1. The act or process of providing or procuring; providence; foresight; preparation; management. Chaucer. « The ill purveyance of his page.» Spenser. 2. That which is provided; provisions; food...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/P/200

purveyance

1. The act or process of providing or procuring; providence; foresight; preparation; management. 'The ill purveyance of his page.' (Spenser) ... 2. That which is provided; provisions; food. ... 3. A providing necessaries for the sovereign by buying them at an appraised value in preference to all others, and oven without the owner's consent. This wa...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

purveyance

in English history, the prerogative of the sovereign to compel the sale of goods at a reduced price to maintain himself and his household as they ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/p/135

Purveyance

Obs. The feudal right of the lord to stay at a vassal's home for a stipulated amount of time. This was generally commuted to a regular monetary payment by the vassal to the lord.
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/p110.htm
No exact match found