Neutrino

A lepton with no electric charge. Neutrinos participate only in weak and gravitational interactions and are therefore very difficult to detect. There are three known types of neutrinos, all of which are very light and could possibly have zero mass.

neutrino

A small particle that has no charge and is thought to have very little mass. Neutrinos are created in energetic collisions between nuclear particles. The universe is filled with them but they rarely collide with anything.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20037

Neutrino

The neutrino is a particle with no mass or charge. It is emitted during Beta decay during the emission of a beta particle. It has no great significance with respect to Radiation Protection but great interest still remains in its properties.
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary.html

neutrino

[n] - an elementary particle with zero charge and zero mass
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=neutrino

Neutrino

A particle that has no charge, and little or no mass.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20448

Neutrino

A neutral lepton; one exists for each of the charged leptons (electron, muon, and tau) all of which are very light and could possibly have zero mass. Neutrinos participate only in weak and gravitational interactions and are therefore very difficult to detect. Neutrinos are created in energetic collisions between nuclear particles. The universe is f...
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/n/e/neutrino/source.html

neutrino

An elementary particle produced by certain nuclear decay processes. Neutrinos have no charge and extremely small masses compared to other subatomic particles.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/n.shtml

neutrino

noun an elementary particle with zero charge and zero mass
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

neutrino

(noo-tre´no) a subatomic particle with an extremely small mass and no electric charge.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

neutrino

elementary subatomic particle with no electric charge, very little mass, and 12 unit of spin. Neutrinos belong to the family of particles called ... [31 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/n/29

neutrino

stable elementary particle with zero charge, spin ½, and rest mass zero or less than one thousandth of that of the electron
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=393-11-09

neutrino

a stable elementary particle with zero charge and a rest mass less than one-thousandth that of the electron
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=881-02-69

neutrino

The three types of neutrinos show in relation to the other known elementary particles. Credit: Fermilab A subatomic particle with no charge and very little mass, that interacts only by the weak force and by gravity. It is a member of the lepton (lightweight) family of particles to which the ele...
Found on http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/N/neutrino.html

neutrino

neutrino (nOOtrē'nō) [Ital.,=little neutral (particle)], elementary particle with no electric charge and a very small mass emitted during the decay of certain other particles. The neutrino was first postulated in 1930 by Wolfgang Pauli in order to maintain the law of conservation of ...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0835331.html

Neutrino

A neutrino is a short-lived uncharged particle of zero or near zero rest mass. They occur in certain nuclear reactions.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/GN.HTM

neutrino

In physics, any of three uncharged elementary particles (and their antiparticles) of the lepton class, having a mass that is very small. The most familiar type, the antiparticle of the electron neutrino, is emitted in the beta decay of a nucleus. The other two are the muon and tau neutrinos
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0029005.html

Neutrino

A lepton with no electric charge. Neutrinos participate only in weak (and gravitational) interactions and therefore are very difficult to detect. There are three known types of neutrino, all of which have very low or possibly even zero mass.
Found on http://www2.slac.stanford.edu/vvc/glossary.html

Neutrino

An uncharged, massless (or at least extremely light), lepton.Like the charged leptons, they can come in three types (or flavours):electron neutrinos, muon neutrinos,or tau neutrinos.
Found on http://hepwww.rl.ac.uk/public/phil/glossary.html

neutrino

a particle with no charge or mass that is given off during beta decay
Found on http://www.chemistry-dictionary.com/definition/neutrino.php

Neutrino

The neutrino is a particle with no mass or charge. It is emitted during Beta decay during the emission of a beta particle. It has no great significance with respect to Radiation Protection but great interest still remains in its properties.
Found on http://www.ionactive.co.uk/glossary_atoz.html?s=az&t=n

Neutrino

A neutrino (oʊ or oʊ) is an electrically neutral, weakly interacting elementary subatomic particle with half-integer spin. The neutrino (meaning `little neutral one` in Italian) is denoted by the Greek letter ν (nu). All evidence suggests that neutrinos have mass but the upper bounds established for their mass are tiny even by the standards o.....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutrino

Neutrino

A fundamental particle produced by the nuclear reactions in stars. Neutrinos are very hard to detect because the vast majority of them pass completely through the Earth without interacting.
Found on http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-glossary.html

Neutrino

An elementary particle produced by certain nuclear decay processes. Neutrinos have no charge and ext
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Science/Chemistry/

Neutrino

A very small particle with no mass or charge.
Found on http://www.kidsastronomy.com/dictionary.htm

Neutrino

A postulated subatomic particle with no charge and no (or very little) mass when at rest
Found on http://jot101.com/2015/05/a-z-of-science-fiction-words/
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