Mark

a bouy set out for racing

Mark

Mark is slang for a suitable victim, especially for swindling. (Known as 'the
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZM.HTM

Mark

The unique identifying symbol of the maker, distinguishing source and quality.
Found on http://www.studiocrafts.com/Craftscapes/glossary.html

Mark

Ancient Measurement Terms: Money. Normally means the silver mark, a measure of silver, generally eight ounces, accepted throughout medieval western Europe. Although they were sometimes 'clipped' or 'debased,' the English silver penny contained a standard weight of silver and so could be traded across Europe. In England the mark was worth thirteen s...
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/measure.htm

mark

[n] - the basic unit of money in Germany 2. [n] - Apostle and companion of Saint Peter 3. [n] - a written or printed symbol (as for punctuation) 4. [n] - a visible indication made on a surface 5. [n] - a symbol of disgrace or infamy 6. [n] - the shortest of the four Gospels in the New Testament 7. [n] - a number or le...
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=mark

Mark

(Ancient Money Terms:) Money. Normally means the silver mark, a measure of silver, generally eight ounces, accepted throughout medieval western Europe. Although they were sometimes 'clipped' or 'debased,' the English silver penny contained a standard weight of silver and so could be traded across Europe. In England the mark was worth thirteen shill...
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/money.htm

Mark

In Celtic legend, king of Cornwall, uncle of Tristan, and suitor and husband of Isolde. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Mark

The earliest british tanks [UK], Experimental self-propelled guns, 1917-1923 [US]
Found on http://www.jedsite.info/index.html

Mark

Mark (märk) noun A license of reprisals. See Marque .
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/24

Mark

Mark noun [ See 2d Marc .] 1. An old weight and coin. See Marc . 'Lend me a mark .' Chaucer. 2. The unit of monetary account of the German Empire, equal to 23.8 cents of United States money; the equivalent of one hundred pfennigs. Also, a silver coin of thi...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/24

Mark

Mark (märk) transitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Marked (märkt); present participle & verbal noun Marking .] [ Middle English marken , merken , Anglo-Saxon mearcian , from mearc . See Mark ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/25

Mark

Mark intransitive verb To take particular notice; to observe critically; to note; to remark. « Mark , I pray you, and see how this man seeketh mischief.» 1 Kings xx. 7.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/M/25

mark

noun a written or printed symbol (as for punctuation); `his answer was just a punctuation mark`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

mark

score noun a number or letter indicating quality (especially of a student`s performance); `she made good marks in algebra`; `grade A milk`; `what was your score on your homework?`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

mark

(mahrk) a spot, blemish, or other circumscribed area visible on the skin or a mucous membrane. birth mark see birthmark. strawberry mark strawberry hemangioma. cavernous hemangioma. vascular nevus. stretch ma...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Mark

• (n.) A license of reprisals. See Marque. • (v. t.) To keep account of; to enumerate and register; as, to mark the points in a game of billiards or cards. • (n.) A fixed object serving for guidance, as of a ship, a traveler, a surveyor, etc.; as, a seamark, a landmark. • (n.) The unit of monetary account of the German Empire, e...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/mark/

mark

(from the article `Australian rules football`) A major difference from other types of football is the awarding of a set kick, or mark, when a player manages to catch the ball directly from the ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/37

mark

former monetary unit of Germany.[9 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/m/37

Mark

unit of account, though not a coin, valued at 13s. 4d
Found on http://www.castles-of-britain.com/glossary.htm

Mark

An identification number or method of relating to the erector which joist, joist girder or other separate part of the building goes at what location when being erected, i.e., J1, K25, L7, G12, or JG9. See Piece Mark and Part Number.
Found on http://www.areforum.org/up/GeneralStructures/JOIST%20AND%20STRUCTURAL%20GLO

Mark

The clapping of the clapstick to create a Sync Mark (1.) for the shot. 2.: A piece of tape on the floor that indicates where an actor should stand.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21112

mark

mark, designation for the free village community that was supposed to have been the unit of primitive German social life. According to a theory formulated in the 19th cent. by Georg Ludwig von Maurer and others, the mark was composed of free men in voluntary association, holding lands communally, an...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/history/A0831886.html

Mark

A word, name, symbol, or device or any combination thereof used to identify and distinguish goods or services and to indicate their source. A mark used on or in the sale of goods is known as a trademark. A mark used in the sale of services is known as a service mark. A mark used by a collective group is known as a collective mark. 15 USC This ter.....
Found on http://www.lectlaw.com/def2/m018.htm

Mark

(n) Mark is the identification made on any document, article, properties etc to prove the concurrence and awareness expected of the of the person who had made the marks.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21213

mark

n. an "X" made by a person who is illiterate or too weak to sign his/her full name, used in the expression "His Mark," or "Her Mark." On the rare occasion that this occurs, the "X" should be within or next to a notation such as "Theresa Testator, her mark." If the mark is intended as a signature to a will it should be formally witnessed (as signatu...
Found on http://dictionary.law.com/Default.xhtml?selected=1213
No exact match found