Hay

The cured dry forage of the finer-stemmed crops e.g. grass.

hay

there is, there are
Found on http://www.spanishpronto.com/spanishpronto/spanishglossary.html

Hay

Dried feed consisting of the entire plant. Alfalfa, clover, grass, and oat hay are used in dairy rations.
Found on http://www.epa.gov/agriculture/ag101/dairyglossary.html

Hay

Stems of grass. Most popular feed for horses and cattle, however gardeners are always looking for 'spoiled hay' or 'mulch hay'. This is hay that has rotted or gotten moldy. It is great for compost piles and using as a mulch. Beware of weed seeds and compost well.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20077

hay

[n] - grass mowed and cured for use as fodder
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=hay

Hay

Grass that is cut and allowed to dry naturally in fields before being baled. This is stored and fed to livestock over the winter. It is less used now due to the unreliablility of the weather and relatively low feed value.
Found on http://www.lethamshank.co.uk/glossary/glossary.php?letter=H

Hay

Hay (hā) noun [ Anglo-Saxon hege : confer French haie , of German origin. See Haw a hedge, Hedge .] 1. A hedge. [ Obsolete] 2. A net set around the haunt of an animal, especially of a rabbit. Rowe. To dance the hay , to dance in ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/20

Hay

Hay intransitive verb To lay snares for rabbits. Huloet.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/20

Hay

Hay noun [ Middle English hei , Anglo-Saxon hēg ; akin to Dutch hooi , Old High German hewi , houwi , German heu , Dan. & Swedish h√∂ , Icelandic hey , ha , Goth. hawi grass, from the root of English hew . See ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/H/20

hay

Grass cut and cured for fodder. 'Make hay while the sun shines.' (Camden) 'Hay may be dried too much as well as too little.' (C. L. Flint) Hay cap, a canvas covering for a haycock. ... <medicine> Hay fever, nasal catarrh accompanied with fever, and sometimes with paroxysms of dyspnoea, to which some persons are subject in the spring and summe...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

hay

noun grass mowed and cured for use as fodder
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

Hay

• (v. i.) To lay snares for rabbits. • (n.) Grass cut and cured for fodder. • (n.) A net set around the haunt of an animal, especially of a rabbit. • (n.) A hedge. • (v. i.) To cut and cure grass for hay.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/hay/

Hay

town, south-central New South Wales, Australia, on the Murrumbidgee River. The settlement originated in 1840 as a coach station known as Lang`s ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/25

hay

in agriculture, dried grasses and other foliage used as animal feed. Usually the material is cut in the field while still green and then either ... [2 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/h/25

Hay

Dried grass used for animal feed. It is cut, left to dry in the field and then baled. It is fed to livestock through the winter when fresh grass not available. Nowadays rarely used except for horses as it's production is unreliable in the UK climate.
Found on http://www.farm-direct.co.uk/shared/glossary.html

Hay

Hay, river, c.530 mi (850 km) long, rising in several headstreams in NE British Columbia and NW Alta., Canada, and flowing generally NE through NW Alta., over Alexander Falls, and into Great Slave Lake. Its valley, a principal north-south route, is followed by a highway and a railroad.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/world/A0823040.html

hay

hay, wild or cultivated plants, chiefly grasses and legumes, mown and dried for use as livestock fodder. Hay is an important factor in cattle raising and is one of the leading crops of the United States. Alfalfa, timothy, and red clover are the principal hay crops. After mowing, the hay is left spre...
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0823041.html

Hay

Hay is American slang for marijuana.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/ZH.HTM

Hay

Hay is the stems and leaves of grasses and other plants cut for fodder, dried in the sun, and stored usually in stacks. The time most suitable for mowing grass intended for hay is that in which the saccharine matter is most abundant in the plants, that is when the grass is in full flower. For the operation of mowing, dry weather, and, if possible, ...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/BH.HTM

hay

Preserved grass used for winter livestock feed. The grass is cut and allowed to dry in the field before being removed for storage in a barn. The optimum period for cutting is when the grass has just come into flower and contains most feed value. During the natural drying process, the moisture content...
Found on http://www.talktalk.co.uk/reference/encyclopaedia/hutchinson/m0022090.html

Hay

Hay is grass, legumes or other herbaceous plants that have been cut, dried, and stored for use as animal fodder, particularly for grazing livestock such as cattle, horses, goats, and sheep. Hay is also fed to pets such as rabbits and guinea pigs. Pigs may be fed hay, but they do not digest it as efficiently as more fully herbivorous animals. Hay c...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hay

hay

enclosure (used loosely in the Middle Ages for any form of enclosure) (R 167); enclosure in the forest (L 237); hedge, from haw[thorn] (S), hence hedged enclosure and OE haga, enclosure generally
Found on http://info.sjc.ox.ac.uk/forests/glossary.htm

Hay

Dry forage.
Found on http://www.crazyforcows.com/glossary/glossary.shtml

hay

enclosure (used loosely in the Middle Ages for any form of enclosure) (R 167); enclosure in the forest (L 237); hedge, from haw[thorn] (S), hence hedged enclosure and OE haga, enclosure generally
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22223

Hay

Dried grass used for animal feed. It is cut, left to dry in the field and then baled. It is fed to livestock through the winter when fresh grass not available. Nowadays rarely used except for horses as it's production is unreliable in the UK climate. See our stock and crops pages for more details.
Found on http://www.farm-direct.co.uk/shared/glossary.html
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