groat

British silver coin with a face value of 4d(1.66p). Its name derives from the word 'great', because of the coin's size compared with the smaller penny. Groats were mainly used 1350-1560, but were issued before and after these dates. The Britannia groat, for example, was issued in the 19thC. This was the same size as the silver 3d but thicker and di …...

Groat

• (n.) Any small sum of money. • (n.) An old English silver coin, equal to four pence.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/groat/

groat

(from the article `coin`) ...by the name of the mint (e.g., CIVITAS LONDON). Edward I also struck halfpennies and farthings to replace the cut pennies that had hitherto done ...
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/72

Groat

4 pence. Silvery coin. Long withdrawn. Price of a short Hackney Carriage ride in early Victorian London. Also means a trifling amount.
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/money.htm

Groat

[coin] The groat is the traditional name of a long-defunct English silver coin worth four English pennies, and also a Scottish coin originally worth fourpence, with later issues being valued at eightpence and one shilling. ==Name== The name has also been applied to any thick or large coin, such as the Groschen (grosso), a silver coin issued...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groat_(coin)

Groat

[grain] Groats (or in some cases, `berries`), are the hulled kernels of various cereal grains such as oat, wheat, and rye. Groats are whole grains that include the cereal germ and fiber-rich bran portion of the grain as well as the endosperm (which is the usual product of milling). Groats can also be produced from pseudocereal seeds such as...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groat_(grain)

Groat

Groat noun [ LG. grōte , orig., great, that is, a great piece of coin, larger than other coins in former use. See Great .] 1. An old English silver coin, equal to four pence. 2. Any small sum of money.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/60

Groat

A groat was an English coin first issued by Edward III in 1351 with a value of one penny and last struck in 1887, by when it was valued at four pennies. A new issue was made by Henry VII, but the groat was discontinued in 1662. It was revived as a silver four penny piece by William IV in 1836, and the fact that its issue having been advised by Jose...
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/JG.HTM

Groat

archaic or obsolete terms > General: A silver coin worth four pennies.
Found on http://www.skyscript.co.uk/glossarytt.html

groat

British silver coin with a face value of 4d(1.66p). Its name derives from the word 'great', because of the coin's size compared with the smaller penny.
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-g.html

groat

English coin worth four pennies. Although first minted in 1279, the groat only became popular in the following century, when silver groats were produced. Half groats were introduced in 1351. ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

Groat

Trifling amount. Fourpenny piece. Price of a short Hackney Carriage ride in early Victorian London.
Found on http://www.hemyockcastle.co.uk/money.htm
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