Goodman

[n] - United States clarinetist who in 1934 formed a big band (including Black as well as White musicians) and introduced a kind of jazz known as swing (1909-1986)
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=Goodman

Goodman

Good'man noun [ Good + man ] 1. A familiar appellation of civility, equivalent to 'My friend', 'Good sir', 'Mister;' -- sometimes used ironically. [ Obsolete] « With you, goodman boy, an you please.» Shak. 2. A husband; the master of a house o...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/44

goodman

1. A familiar appellation of civility, equivalent to 'My friend', 'Good sir', 'Mister;' sometimes used ironically. 'With you, goodman boy, an you please.' (Shak) ... 2. A husband; the master of a house or family; often used in speaking familiarly. 'Say ye to the goodman of the house, . . . Where is the guest-chamber ?' (Mark xiv. 14) ... In the ear...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

Goodman

• (n.) A husband; the master of a house or family; -- often used in speaking familiarly. • (n.) A familiar appellation of civility, equivalent to `My friend`, `Good sir`, `Mister;` -- sometimes used ironically.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/goodman/

Goodman

[title] Goodman was once a polite term of address, used where Mister (Mr.) would be used today. A man addressed by this title was, however, of a lesser social rank than a man addressed as Mister. Compare Goodwife. The terms were used in England and Puritan New England. They are perhaps best known today as the forms of address used in Arthur...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goodman_(title)
No exact match found