galliard

a lively court dance of Italian origin, usually in triple time.
Found on http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/glossary.htm

galliard

(French gaillard: `lively`), vigorous 16th-century European court dance. Its four hopping steps and one high leap permitted athletic gentlemen to ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/g/5

Galliard

• (a.) A gay, lively dance. Cf. Gailliarde. • (a.) Gay; brisk; active. • (n.) A brisk, gay man.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/galliard/

Galliard

[typeface] Galliard is the name of a serif typeface designed by Matthew Carter and issued in 1978 by the Mergenthaler Linotype Company. Galliard is based on the sixteenth-century type of Robert Granjon. According to Alexander Lawson, `The name Galliard stems from Granjon`s own term for an 8-point font he cut about 1570. It undoubtedly refer...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galliard_(typeface)

Galliard

Gal'liard adjective [ Middle English , from French gaillard , perhaps of Celtic origin; confer Ir. & Gael. galach valiant, or Anglo-Saxon gagol , geagl , wanton, lascivious.] Gay; brisk; active. [ Obsolete]
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/4

Galliard

Gal'liard noun A brisk, gay man. [ Obsolete] « Selden is a galliard by himself.» Cleveland.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/G/4

galliard

brisk; gallant; lively
Found on http://phrontistery.info/g.html

Galliard

Music written for a lively French dance for two performers written in triple time.
Found on http://www.classicalworks.com/html/glossary.html

Galliard

Music written for a lively French dance for two performers written in triple time.
Found on http://www.superglossary.com/Glossary/Entertainment/Music/

Galliard

quick and lively, also the name of a dance done in triple time
Found on http://tudorswiki.sho.com/page/Tudor+Words+Glossary

galliard

sprightly Renaissance and Baroque dance
Found on http://phrontistery.info/g.html

Galliard

The galliard was a spirited dance in triple time for two persons, popular in the 16th and 17th centuries.
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/VG.HTM
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