foam

  1. a mass of small bubbles formed in or on a liquid
  2. a lightweight material in cellular form; made by introducing gas bubbles during manufacture

foam

a two-phase system, similar to an emulsion, in which the dispersed phase is a gas or air.

FOAM

acronym: Fates of Aromatic Model
Found on http://cdiac.ornl.gov/pns/acronyms.html#F

Foam

The light-colored substance which is made up of an aggregation of bubbles, formed on the surface of liquids by violent agitation.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20127

foam

[n] - a lightweight material in cellular form 2. [n] - a mass of small bubbles formed in or on a liquid 3. [v] - of liquids 4. [v] - make froth, become bubbly
Found on http://www.webdictionary.co.uk/definition.php?query=foam

Foam

A colloid in which bubbles of gas are suspended in a solid or liquid. Aerogel and Styrafoam are examples of solid foams; whipped cream is an example of a liquid foam. See also: Colloid.
Found on http://www.diracdelta.co.uk/science/source/f/o/foam/source.html

Foam

Colloidal suspension of a gas in a liquid.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20728

foam

Compare with colloid. A colloid in which bubbles of gas are suspended in a solid or liquid. Aerogel (solid smoke) and Styrafoam are examples of solid foams; whipped cream is an example of a liquid foam.
Found on http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/glossary/f.shtml

foam

Foams are dispersions of gases in liquids or solids. The gas globule may be of any size, from colloidal to macroscopic, as in soap bubbles. Bakers' bread and sponge rubber are examples of solid foams. Typical liquid foams are those used in fire-fighting, shaving creams, etc. Foams made by mechanical incorporation of air are widely used in the food ...
Found on http://www.ktf-split.hr/periodni/en/abc/f.html

Foam

Foam (fōm) noun [ Middle English fam , fom , Anglo-Saxon fām ; akin to Old High German & German feim .] The white substance, consisting of an aggregation of bubbles, which is formed on the surface of liquids, or in the mouth of an animal, by violent agitation or...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/51

Foam

Foam intransitive verb [ imperfect & past participle Foamed (fōmd); present participle & verbal noun Foaming .] [ Anglo-Saxon f?man . See Foam , noun ] 1. To gather foam; to froth; as...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/51

Foam

Foam transitive verb To cause to foam; as, to foam the goblet; also (with out), to throw out with rage or violence, as foam. ' Foaming out their own shame.' Jude 13.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/F/51

foam

fizz verb form bubbles; `The boiling soup was frothing`; `The river was foaming`; `Sparkling water`
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20974

foam

(fōm) a dispersion of a gas in a liquid or solid, such as whipped cream or foam rubber. frothy saliva, produced particularly on exertion or pathologically. to produce, or cause to produce, froth.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21001

Foam

• (n.) To form foam, or become filled with foam; -- said of a steam boiler when the water is unduly agitated and frothy, as because of chemical action. • (n.) The white substance, consisting of an aggregation of bubbles, which is formed on the surface of liquids, or in the mouth of an animal, by violent agitation or fermentation; froth; s...
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/foam/

foam

in physical chemistry, a colloidal system (i.e., a dispersion of particles in a continuous medium) in which the particles are gas bubbles and the ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/f/41

foam

Type: Term Pronunciation: fōm Definitions: 1. Masses of small bubbles on the surface of a liquid. 2. To produce such bubbles. 3. Masses of air cells in a solid or semisolid, as in foam rubber.
Found on http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=34218

Foam

[organization] FoAM describes itself as `a network of transdisciplinary labs for speculative culture`. The networked, Brussels-based collective constitutes a group of designers, scientists, cooks, artists, engineers and gardeners who share an interest in taking knowledge from their respective areas of expertise and applying it in new public...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foam_(organization)

foam

insulating material composed of closed cells, generally made of polyurethane, used to prevent the ingress and migration of moisture NOTE - Foam is generally used to fill tubes and similar insulating structures.
Found on http://www.electropedia.org/iev/iev.nsf/display?openform&ievref=651-02-03

foam

foam: see colloid.
Found on http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0913467.html

foam

Mass of beaten egg and sugar as in sponge cake before the flour is added.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21409

Foam

Colloidal suspension of a gas in a liquid.
Found on http://www.chemistry-dictionary.com/definition/foam.php

foam

A foam is a stable, or otherwise, dispersion of a gas in a liquid.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22437

Foam

[culinary] The use of foam in cuisine has been used in many forms in the history of cooking. For example, whipped cream, meringue, and mousse are all foams. In these cases, the incorporation of air or another gas creates a lighter texture and/or different mouth feel. More recently, foams have become a part of molecular gastronomy technique....
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foam_(culinary)

Foam

A foam is a substance that is formed by trapping pockets of gas in a liquid or solid. A bath sponge and the head on a glass of beer are examples of foams. In most foams, the volume of gas is large, with thin films of liquid or solid separating the regions of gas. An important division of solid foams is into closed-cell foams and open-cell foams. I...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foam
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