Ecotone

Transition zone between two diverse communities (e.g. the tundra-boreal forest ecotone).

Ecotone

A habitat created by the juxtaposition of distinctly different habitats; an edge habitat; or an ecological zone or boundary where two or more ecosystems meet.
Found on https://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20094

ecotone

A transition area between two distinct habitats, where the ranges of the organisms in each bordering habitat overlap, and where there are organisms unique to the transition area. ... (09 Oct 1997) ...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20973

ecotone

a transition area of vegetation between two different plant communities, such as forest and grassland. It has some of the characteristics of each ... [3 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/e/9

ecotone

ecotone 1. In ecology, a transition zone between two distinct habitats that contains species from each area, as well as organisms unique to it. 2. In anthropology, such an area of transition in which certain game or vegetation overlap; a region of primary importance for human subsistence. An ecotone is a transition area between two adjacent ecolog...
Found on http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2161/

Ecotone

Boundary zone between two unique community types.
Found on http://www.physicalgeography.net/physgeoglos/e.html

Ecotone

a habitat created by the juxtaposition of distinctly different habitats; an edge habitat; a zone of transition between habitat types (Ricklefs 1970:869) or adjacent ecological systems having a set of characteristics uniquely defined by space and time scales and by the strength of the interactions (Hansen and diCastri 1990:6) (see Boundary).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21070

ecotone

An edge; a transitional area between two habitat types, or between successional stages of a single habitat type.
Found on http://www.neonaturalist.com/nature/nature_glossary.html

ecotone

(Gk: oikos house; teino to stretch; ) a landscape boundary which exists between two or more adjacent communities or habitats, also known as edge.
Found on http://www.seafriends.org.nz/books/glossary.htm

Ecotone

transition zone between two adjoining communities
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/21767

Ecotone

An ecotone is a transition area between two biomes. It is where two communities meet and integrate. It may be narrow or wide, and it may be local (the zone between a field and forest) or regional (the transition between forest and grassland ecosystems). An ecotone may appear on the ground as a gradual blending of the two communities across a broad...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecotone

Ecotone

a transition zone between two distinct habitats that contains species from each area, as well as organisms unique to it (Morris 1992).
Found on http://imnh.isu.edu/digitalatlas/bio/glsry.htm

Ecotone

a habitat created by the juxtaposition of distinctly different habitats; an edge habitat; a zone of transition between habitat types (Ricklefs 1979:869) or adjacent ecological systems having a set of characteristics uniquely defined by space and time scales and by the strength of the interactions (Hansen and diCastri 1992:6) (see Boundary).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22030

Ecotone

The edge of a habitat; quite often the edge between two different habitats.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22214

Ecotone

a habitat created by the juxtaposition of distinctly different habitats; an edge habitat; a zone of transition between habitat types (Ricklefs 1979869) or adjacent ecological systems having a set of characteristics uniquely defined by space and time scales and by the strength of the interactions (Hansen and diCastri 19926) (see Boundary).
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/22216

ecotone

a transition area between two distinct, but adjoining, communities.
Found on http://www.dnr.state.md.us/forests/gloss.html

Ecotone

transition zone between two adjoining communities
Found on http://www.calflora.net/botanicalnames/botanicalterms.html

ecotone

A transitional area between two or more distinct ecological communities.
Found on https://ruffnermountain.org/glossary/
No exact match found