delftware

The name given to British TIN-GLAZED EARTHENWARE. Following the Dutch lead, British maiolica in the Italian style was introduced in the mid to late 16thC, principally at Southwark and Lambeth in London. But it was the emulation of the delft approach to Oriental styles, with Dutch-style landscapes, and from 1690, the use of a second, lead or kwaart …...

Delftware

Delftware, or Delft pottery, denotes blue and white pottery made in and around Delft in the Netherlands and the tin-glazed pottery made in the Netherlands from the 16th century. Delftware in the latter sense is a type of pottery in which a white glaze is applied, usually decorated with metal oxides. Delftware includes pottery objects of all descri...
Found on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delftware

Delftware

• (n.) Pottery made at the city of Delft in Holland; hence: • (n.) Earthenware made in imitation of the above; any glazed earthenware made for table use, and the like.
Found on http://thinkexist.com/dictionary/meaning/delftware/

Delftware

Delft'ware` noun (a) Pottery made at the city of Delft in Holland; hence: (b) Earthenware made in imitation of the above; any glazed earthenware made for table use, and the like.
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/webster/D/28

Delftware

Delftware, or Delf, is a kind of pottery covered with an enamel or white glazing which gives it outwardly the appearance of porcelain. It was originally manufactured in the Dutch town of Delft in the 14th century and was decorated with designs in blue, and was among the best pottery of its day. Ware of the same kind is still made at various places....
Found on http://www.probertencyclopaedia.com/browse/AD.HTM

delftware

Term used in England for a once-fired pottery object dipped in a slurry made up of a glossy lead glaze made opaque by the addition of tin oxide. A design is painted on in blue, yellow, and other...
Found on http://www.encyclo.co.uk/local/20688

delftware

The name given to British tin-glazed earthenware. Following the Dutch lead, British maiolica in the Italian style was introduced in the mid to late 16thC, principally at Southwark and Lambeth in London. But it was the emulation of the delft approach to Oriental styles, with Dutch-style landscapes, and from 1690, the use of a second, lead or kwaart ...
Found on http://www.antique-marks.com/antique-terms-d.html

delftware

tin-glazed earthenware first made early in the 17th century at Delft, Holland. Dutch potters later brought the art of tin glazing to England along ... [4 related articles]
Found on http://www.britannica.com/eb/a-z/d/27
No exact match found